Sarcoplasmic Reticulum, Calcium Waves and Myometrial Signalling

  1. Derek J. Chadwick Organizer and
  2. Jamie A. Goode
  1. Roger C. Young

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470853050.ch13

Role Of The Sarcoplasmic Reticulum In Smooth Muscle: Novartis Foundation Symposium 246

Role Of The Sarcoplasmic Reticulum In Smooth Muscle: Novartis Foundation Symposium 246

How to Cite

Young, R. C. (2002) Sarcoplasmic Reticulum, Calcium Waves and Myometrial Signalling, in Role Of The Sarcoplasmic Reticulum In Smooth Muscle: Novartis Foundation Symposium 246 (eds D. J. Chadwick and J. A. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470853050.ch13

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Suite 634, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 15 JUN 2002

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470844793

Online ISBN: 9780470853054

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Summary

Ca2+ waves are rises of intracellular free Ca2+ that occur in a temporally and spatially coordinated manner, such that a leading edge of a wave front can be clearly discerned. Waves that occur within the bounds of a single cell are termed intracellular Ca2+ waves. Generation of a Ca2+ wave may be the end result of multiple cellular signalling events and, consequently, is a mechanism of signal integration or information processing. Passage of a Ca2+ wave is a mechanism for signalling within a cell, or across a cell. This paper reviews intracellular Ca2+ waves and their relationship with the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in uterine smooth muscle. Wave speeds are the rate at which the leading front of the Ca2+ wave travels, and are measured by time-lapse imaging of Ca2+-dependent fluorescent dyes. Waves can be experimentally generated in cultured cells by agonist or mechanical stimulation. Wave speeds are unaffected by the removal of Ca2+ in the bathing solution, indicating that the source of the Ca2+ is the SR. The mechanisms of intracellular wave propagation can be investigated by modulating the Ca2+ release mechanisms of the SR. The mechanism most consistent with our observations is that propagation of intracellular Ca2+ waves in cultured human uterine myocytes is SR Ca2+ release that can utilize InsP3 receptors alone, Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release receptors alone, or both together. The rate-determining step for Ca2+ wave propagation is diffusion of Ca2+ through a highly buffered cytoplasm. Passage of a Ca2+ wave also results in capacitative Ca2+ entry, which links deep cytoplasmic Ca2+ changes to subplasmalemmal Ca2+ concentrations.