Chapter 3. Rethinking Th2 Antibody Responses and Allergic Sensitization

  1. Gregory Bock Organizer and
  2. Jamie Goode
  1. Debra Stern1,
  2. Waltraud Eder1,2,
  3. Gina Tebow1,
  4. I.Carla Lohman1,
  5. Elisa Soprana3,
  6. Charlotte Braun-Fahrländer4,
  7. Josef Riedler5,
  8. Dennis Nowak6,
  9. Erika Von Mutius2,
  10. Marilyn Halonen1 and
  11. Donata Vercelli1,*

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470861193.ch3

Anaphylaxis: Novartis Foundation Symposium 257

Anaphylaxis: Novartis Foundation Symposium 257

How to Cite

Stern, D., Eder, W., Tebow, G., Lohman, I.Carla., Soprana, E., Braun-Fahrländer, C., Riedler, J., Nowak, D., Von Mutius, E., Halonen, M. and Vercelli, D. (2004) Rethinking Th2 Antibody Responses and Allergic Sensitization, in Anaphylaxis: Novartis Foundation Symposium 257 (eds G. Bock and J. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470861193.ch3

Author Information

  1. 1

    Arizona Respiratory Center and Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

  2. 2

    University Children's Hospital, Munich, Germany

  3. 3

    Molecular Immunoregulation Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano, Italy

  4. 4

    Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland

  5. 5

    Children's Hospital Salzburg, Paediatric Pulmonology and Allergology, Salzburg, Austria

  6. 6

    Institute of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Munich, Munich, Germany

*Arizona Respiratory Center and Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

  1. The ALEX Study group includes: Albrecht Bufe, David Carr, Leticia Grize, Udo Herz, Otto Holst, Roger P. Lauener, Soyoun Maisch, Harald Renz, Rudolf Schierl, and Marco Waser.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 23 JAN 2004

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470861141

Online ISBN: 9780470861196

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Keywords:

  • Th2 cytokines;
  • atopic dermatitis;
  • chronic parasitic infections;
  • allergen sensitization;
  • gene–environment interactions

Summary

Human Th2 cytokines (interleukins 4 and 13) induce co-expression of IgE and IgG4 through sequential switching. The regulation of IgG4 responses and the role of these responses in the pathogenesis of allergy have not been characterized. We are addressing these issues by comparing and contrasting the expression of allergen-specific IgE and IgG4 in a population of European children thoroughly defined for lifestyle, environmental exposures and allergic phenotypes. The current analysis focused exclusively on children from non-farming families (n=493) in order to avoid potential effects of exposure to microbial products abundant in farming environments. We found that allergens induce Th2-mediated IgG4 and/or IgE responses in the majority of the population. Approximately two-thirds of the children had allergen-specific IgG4 but not IgE, only a minority had both IgG4 and IgE, only a few were negative for both, and virtually none had only IgE. The prevalence of asthma and hay fever was dramatically higher in children with high IgG4 and IgE compared to children who only mounted IgG4 or low IgG4 and IgE responses. These results appear to recapitulate different stages of in vivo Th2-dependent sequential switching from IgG4 to IgE. These patterns of Th2-induced antibody responses may warrant a redefinition of the notion of allergen sensitization.