Qualitative and Quantitative in vivo Assessment of Articular Cartilage Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  1. Gregory Bock Organizer and
  2. Jamie Goode
  1. Elizabeth O'Byrne,
  2. Theodore Pellas and
  3. Didier Laurent

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470867973.ch14

Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249

Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249

How to Cite

O'Byrne, E., Pellas, T. and Laurent, D. (2008) Qualitative and Quantitative in vivo Assessment of Articular Cartilage Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging, in Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249 (eds G. Bock and J. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470867973.ch14

Author Information

  1. Department of Arthritis Biology, Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research, 556 Morris Avenue, Summit, NJ 07901-1398, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 11 MAR 2003

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470844816

Online ISBN: 9780470867976

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Summary

The molecular organization and biochemical composition that give cartilage the viscoelasticity necessary for load distribution also convey unique magnetic resonance (MR) properties. In that context, MR imaging has the potential to detect cartilage degeneration and regeneration. Magnetization transfer (MT) imaging probes the exchange of magnetization between the bulk water pool and the water pool bound to macromolecules such as collagen and hence MT may be applied for evaluation of collagen integrity. In addition, Gd(DTPA)2−-induced T1 changes have been proposed as a surrogate marker of proteoglycan (PG) loss based on the principle that the paramagnetic agent Gd(DTPA)2− penetrates cartilage to an equilibrium concentration inversely proportional to the negative charge density (i.e. the PG concentration). Results obtained in vivo from MT and Gd(DTPA)2−-enhanced MRI acquisitions on the goat knee showed early signs of biochemical changes in response to a papain injection. A dose-dependent effect of papain was observed with both approaches over a wide range of PG depletion (i.e. T1 measurement) and collagen damage (i.e. MT measurement) as confirmed with post-mortem biochemistry and histology. Development of MRI protocols for non-invasive assessment of cartilage will facilitate diagnosis and monitoring of treatment efficacy in the clinic.