Quantitative Analysis of Repair Tissue Biopsies Following Chondrocyte Implantation

  1. Gregory Bock Organizer and
  2. Jamie Goode
  1. Anthony P. Hollander1,
  2. Sally C. Dickinson1,
  3. Trevor J. Sims1,
  4. Carlo Soranzo2 and
  5. Alessandra Pavesio2

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470867973.ch16

Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249

Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249

How to Cite

Hollander, A. P., Dickinson, S. C., Sims, T. J., Soranzo, C. and Pavesio, A. (2003) Quantitative Analysis of Repair Tissue Biopsies Following Chondrocyte Implantation, in Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249 (eds G. Bock and J. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470867973.ch16

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Bristol Academic Rheumatology, Avon Orthopaedic Centre, Southmead Hospital, Bristol BS10 5NB, UK

  2. 2

    Fidia Advanced Biopolymers srl, Via Ponte della Fabbrica 3/B, 35031 Abano Terme (PD), Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 11 MAR 2003

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470844816

Online ISBN: 9780470867976

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Summary

Outcome measures for cartilage repair techniques include clinical assessment of functional status, magnetic resonance imaging, mechanical indentation in situ and second-look biopsies, which are used for detailed ex vivo histological and immunohistochemical assessment. Biopsy analysis is considered an important outcome measure, despite being highly invasive, since it provides a visual record of the spatial organization of matrix proteins and cells. We propose that the value of second-look biopsies would be significantly enhanced if accurate quantification of cartilage matrix molecules could also be obtained. The goal of our work has been to develop a combined method for histological and biochemical analysis of a single biopsy. We have developed a method of cutting frozen sections of cartilage and recovering the uncut tissue for subsequent biochemical analysis. We have also developed a range of miniaturized assays that can be performed after cartilage digestion with trypsin. In this way we are now able to analyse biopsies with a wet weight as low as 5 mg using both histological and biochemical methods, so obtaining the maximum amount of information from the minimum volume of tissue. This new approach will allow a more accurate assessment of the quality of cartilage repair tissue than histological analysis alone.