From the Preclinical Model to the Patient

  1. Gregory Bock Organizer and
  2. Jamie Goode
  1. Ernst B. Hunziker

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470867973.ch6

Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249

Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249

How to Cite

Hunziker, E. B. (2008) From the Preclinical Model to the Patient, in Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249 (eds G. Bock and J. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470867973.ch6

Author Information

  1. ITI Institute for Dental and Skeletal Biology, University of Bern, Murtenstrasse 35, P.O. Box 54, CH-3010 Bern, Switzerland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 11 MAR 2003

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470844816

Online ISBN: 9780470867976

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Summary

Tissue engineering studies are complex in nature and involve many stages of testing before an experimental construct is ripe for human clinical trials. Biocompatibility questions, toxicological problems, pharmacological aspects, safety issues and proof of the principle itself represent but a few of the concerns that must be addressed. This contribution deals with the different types of animal experiment that are usually undertaken in tissue engineering studies. During the initial phase, small animal models are used to screen all potential components of the proposed construct, such as matrix, cells and signalling substances. In the second, the principle itself is put to the test using an appropriate defect model in a suitable animal species. Careful consideration of these latter two aspects is of paramount importance, many factors having to be considered and special requirements satisfied for meaningful experimentation. Finally, clinically relevant models are set up in animals to furnish basic information respecting the construct's suitability and ripeness for testing in human clinical trials.