Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bioceramics: Strategies to Regenerate the Skeleton

  1. Gregory Bock Organizer and
  2. Jamie Goode
  1. Hajime Ohgushi,
  2. Jun Miyake and
  3. Tetsuya Tateishi

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470867973.ch9

Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249

Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249

How to Cite

Ohgushi, H., Miyake, J. and Tateishi, T. (2003) Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bioceramics: Strategies to Regenerate the Skeleton, in Tissue Engineering of Cartilage and Bone: Novartis Foundation Symposium 249 (eds G. Bock and J. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470867973.ch9

Author Information

  1. Tissue Engineering Research Center (TERC), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 3-11-46 Nakouji, Amagasaki City, Hyogo 661-0794, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 11 MAR 2003

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470844816

Online ISBN: 9780470867976

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Summary

Bone is formed by cells called osteoblasts, which arise from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The cells are known to exist in thin tissues surrounding bone (periosteum) and bone marrow, but the population is extremely small. The number of marrow-derived MSCs can be expanded using tissue culture techniques. These culture-expanded MSCs have the in vitro capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts. Importantly, the cultured osteoblasts can form extracellular matrix in culture. This matrix consists of fine crystals of hydroxyapatite comparable to natural bone mineral, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. It is possible to fabricate the osteoblasts/bone matrix on the surface of bioceramics. Thus in vitro cultured bone can show further bone-forming capability after in vivo implantation. We have begun studying this tissue-engineering approach in patients with skeletal problems. This paper describes this and other approaches using MSCs to regenerate skeletal tissue.