Neurotransplantation in Neurodegenerative Disease: A Survey of Relevant Issues in Developmental Neurobiology

  1. Derek J. Chadwick Organizer and
  2. Jamie A. Goode
  1. Jack Price1,
  2. Dafe Uwangho2,
  3. Scott Peters2,
  4. Diane Galloway2 and
  5. Karen Mellodew2

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470870834.ch10

Neural Transplantation in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Status and New Directions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 231

Neural Transplantation in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Status and New Directions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 231

How to Cite

Price, J., Uwangho, D., Peters, S., Galloway, D. and Mellodew, K. (2000) Neurotransplantation in Neurodegenerative Disease: A Survey of Relevant Issues in Developmental Neurobiology, in Neural Transplantation in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Status and New Directions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 231 (eds D. J. Chadwick and J. A. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470870834.ch10

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, London SE5 8AF, UK

  2. 2

    ReNeuron Limited, Europoint Centre, 5–11 Lavington Street, London SE1 0NZ, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 23 OCT 2000

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471492467

Online ISBN: 9780470870839

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Summary

Neural development and transplantation therapies in neurodegenerative disease share a particular feature. In both cases, undifferentiated neural precursor cells are required to differentiate into a range of neural cell types in a tissue-specific fashion. This similarity opens the possibility that the mechanisms that drive neural development play a similar role in CNS repair. In this chapter, two aspects of neural development are considered in terms of their relevance to CNS repair: the diversity of neural precursor cells and positional specification. We present evidence to suggest that neural stem cells have a degree of diversity that is beyond what might have been expected a priori. We also show that neural stem cells express genes that might encode a positional specification for these cells, and consider a number of hypotheses about the role of positional specification in CNS repair.