Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus

  1. Derek J. Chadwick Organizer and
  2. Jamie A. Goode
  1. Gerd Kempermann1,2 and
  2. Fred H. Gage1,*

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470870834.ch14

Neural Transplantation in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Status and New Directions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 231

Neural Transplantation in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Status and New Directions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 231

How to Cite

Kempermann, G. and Gage, F. H. (2000) Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus, in Neural Transplantation in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Status and New Directions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 231 (eds D. J. Chadwick and J. A. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470870834.ch14

Author Information

  1. 1

    The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA

  2. 2

    Neurologische Universitätsklinik, Universitätsstr. 84, D-93053 Regensburg, Germany

*The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Laboratory of Genetics, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 23 OCT 2000

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471492467

Online ISBN: 9780470870839

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Summary

The surprising finding that the adult hippocampus produces new neurons throughout life has challenged many old views about the brain, because the brain appears to be plastic enough to integrate new neurons. Research on adult hippocampal neurogenesis also allows one to study neuronal stem or progenitor cells in the mature and working brain. It therefore will provide key information necessary for any attempt to use neuronal stem cells in situ to treat neurological disease. Although this new strategy holds great promise, a large number of questions, some of which are discussed herein, remain to be addressed.