Neural Transplantation in Parkinson's Disease

  1. Derek J. Chadwick Organizer and
  2. Jamie A. Goode
  1. Olle Lindvall

Published Online: 7 OCT 2008

DOI: 10.1002/0470870834.ch7

Neural Transplantation in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Status and New Directions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 231

Neural Transplantation in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Status and New Directions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 231

How to Cite

Lindvall, O. (2000) Neural Transplantation in Parkinson's Disease, in Neural Transplantation in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Status and New Directions: Novartis Foundation Symposium 231 (eds D. J. Chadwick and J. A. Goode), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470870834.ch7

Author Information

  1. Section of Restorative Neurology, Wallenberg Neuroscience Center, University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 OCT 2008
  2. Published Print: 23 OCT 2000

Book Series:

  1. Novartis Foundation Symposia

Book Series Editors:

  1. Novartis Foundation

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471492467

Online ISBN: 9780470870839

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Summary

Transplanted human embryonic dopamine neurons reinnervate the striatum in patients with Parkinson's disease. The grafts can exhibit long-term survival without immunological rejection and despite an ongoing disease process and continuous antiparkinsonian drug treatment. Recent findings using positron emission tomography indicate that the grafts are functionally integrated in the patient's brain and release dopamine into the striatum. In the most successful cases, patients have been able to withdraw L-dopa treatment after transplantation and resume an independent life. About two-thirds of grafted patients have shown clinically useful, partial recovery of motor function: increased percentage of time in the ‘on’-phase and reduced rigidity and hypokinesia during ‘off’-phases, bilaterally but predominantly on the side contralateral to the graft. Gait, speed, balance and dyskinesias have not exhibited any major, consistent improvements. Current research aims at solving three main problems: (a) large amounts of human embryonic mesencephalic tissue are needed for therapeutic effects; (b) symptomatic relief is incomplete and varies between patients; and (c) patient selection and grafting procedure have not been optimized.