Chapter 27. Rules and Tools for Software Evolution Planning and Management

  1. Nazim H. Madhavji Professor Chair2,
  2. Juan C. Fernández-Ramil BSc, MEM, PhD Lecturer3 and
  3. Dewayne E. Perry Chair Director Co-Editor associate editor4
  1. Meir M. Lehman1 and
  2. Juan C. Fernáandez-Ramil3

Published Online: 15 JUN 2006

DOI: 10.1002/0470871822.ch27

Software Evolution and Feedback: Theory and Practice

Software Evolution and Feedback: Theory and Practice

How to Cite

Lehman, M. M. and Fernáandez-Ramil, J. C. (2006) Rules and Tools for Software Evolution Planning and Management, in Software Evolution and Feedback: Theory and Practice (eds N. H. Madhavji, J. C. Fernández-Ramil and D. E. Perry), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/0470871822.ch27

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Computer Science, University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada

  2. 3

    Computing Department, Faculty of Maths and Computing and Centre for Research in computing The Open University Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK

  3. 4

    Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    School of Computing, Middlesex University, London, UK

  2. 3

    Computing Department, Faculty of Maths and Computing and Centre for Research in computing The Open University Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUN 2006
  2. Published Print: 7 APR 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470871805

Online ISBN: 9780470871829

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Keywords:

  • software evolution phenomenon;
  • software evolution laws;
  • S- and E-Type Program Classification;
  • software evolution planning and management tools;
  • Global E-type system evolution;
  • organisational stability conservation;
  • conservation of familiarity;
  • continuing growth;
  • FEAST hypothesis

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Laws of Software Evolution

  • S- and E-Type Program Classification

  • First Law: Continuing Change

  • Second Law: Increasing Complexity

  • Third Law: Self Regulation

  • Fourth Law: Conservation of Organisational Stability

  • Fifth Law: Conservation of Familiarity

  • Sixth Law: Continuing Growth

  • Seventh Law: Declining Quality

  • Eighth Law: Feedback System

  • The FEAST Hypothesis

  • The Principle of Software Uncertainty

  • Conclusions

  • Acknowledgements

  • References