Unit

UNIT 2.19 Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy: Detecting and Interpreting the Mobility of Transmembrane Proteins In Vivo

  1. Nina Malchus

Published Online: 1 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/0471140856.tx0219s48

Current Protocols in Toxicology

Current Protocols in Toxicology

How to Cite

Malchus, N. 2011. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy: Detecting and Interpreting the Mobility of Transmembrane Proteins In Vivo. Current Protocols in Toxicology. 48:2.19:2.19.1–2.19.16.

Author Information

  1. German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: MAY 2011

Abstract

Mobility of proteins is crucial for their functionality. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a sensitive tool for assessing dynamics in vivo. It can reveal properties of diffusing proteins, as well as of the surrounding medium. Hence, subtle changes in the dynamics after treatment with toxic substances can be visualized. On biological membranes, the high concentration of transmembrane and peripheral membrane proteins leads to molecular crowding, and thus to a change in the diffusion behavior, i.e., to anomalous diffusion of membrane proteins. Presented here is a protocol for conducting and evaluating FCS measurements of membrane proteins before and after treatment. Curr. Protoc. Toxicol. 48:2.19.1-2.19.16. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Keywords:

  • fluorescence correlation spectroscopy;
  • anomalous diffusion;
  • membrane proteins