Unit

UNIT 5.2 Measurement of Bioavailability: Measuring Absorption Through Skin In Vivo in Rats and Humans

  1. Stephen V. Bounds,
  2. David R. Hawkins

Published Online: 1 MAY 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0471140856.tx0502s00

Current Protocols in Toxicology

Current Protocols in Toxicology

How to Cite

Bounds, S. V. and Hawkins, D. R. 2001. Measurement of Bioavailability: Measuring Absorption Through Skin In Vivo in Rats and Humans. Current Protocols in Toxicology. 00:5.2:5.2.1–5.2.10.

Author Information

  1. Huntingdon Life Science, Huntingdon, England

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 MAY 2001
  2. Published Print: MAY 1999

Abstract

Absorption through the skin is a route of exposure to a wide variety of therapeutic and/or environmental compounds. In vivo assays are advantageous in that they retain intact epidermal and dermal structures and thus reflect a more normal situation. The test compound is applied to the skin in a protected area for a specified period of time. At the end of the incubation, skin, tissues, and excreta are assessed for the presence of the test compound. The assay can also be performed with volatile compounds. When performed using laboratory animals, it is possible to assess the distribution of the compound throughout the body. If human volunteers are studied such analysis is limited to the skin, blood, and excreta.