Unit

UNIT 18.16 Mining the Salivary Proteome with Grating-Coupled Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging and Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission Microarrays

  1. Ryan D. Molony1,5,
  2. James M. Rice1,5,
  3. Jong Seol Yuk1,
  4. Vivek Shetty2,
  5. Dipak Dey3,
  6. David A. Lawrence4,
  7. Michael A. Lynes1,4

Published Online: 1 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/0471140856.tx1816s53

Current Protocols in Toxicology

Current Protocols in Toxicology

How to Cite

Molony, R. D., Rice, J. M., Yuk, J. S., Shetty, V., Dey, D., Lawrence, D. A. and Lynes, M. A. 2012. Mining the Salivary Proteome with Grating-Coupled Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging and Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission Microarrays. Current Protocols in Toxicology. 53:18.16:18.16.1–18.16.19.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut

  2. 2

    School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

  3. 3

    Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut

  4. 4

    Wadsworth Center, New York Department of Health, Albany, New York

  5. 5

    These authors contributed equally and should be considered co-first authors

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 AUG 2012

Abstract

Biological indicators have numerous and widespread utility in personalized medicine, but the measurement of these indicators also poses many technological and practical challenges. Blood/plasma has typically been used as the sample source with which to measure these indicators, but the invasiveness associated with sample procurement has led to increased interest in saliva as an attractive alternative. However, there are unique issues associated with the measurement of saliva biomarkers. These issues are compounded by the imperfect correlation between saliva and plasma with respect to biomarker profiles. In this manuscript, we address the technical challenges associated with saliva biomarker quantification. We describe a high-content microarray assay that employs both grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance imaging and surface plasmon–coupled emission modalities in a highly sensitive assay with a large dynamic range. This powerful approach provides the tools to map the proteome of saliva, which in turn should greatly enhance the utility of salivary biomarker profiles in personalized medicine. Curr. Protoc. Toxicol. 53:18.16.1-18.16.19. © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Keywords:

  • saliva;
  • biomarker;
  • proteomics;
  • surface plasmon resonance;
  • SPR;
  • emission microarray;
  • GCSPR;
  • GCSPCE;
  • personalized medicine;
  • biofluid;
  • biomolecule