Unit

UNIT 14.28 Isolation and Characterization of Potential Cancer Stem Cells from Solid Human Tumors—Potential Applications

  1. Zachary C. Dobbin,
  2. Charles N. Landen

Published Online: 2 DEC 2013

DOI: 10.1002/0471141755.ph1428s63

Current Protocols in Pharmacology

Current Protocols in Pharmacology

How to Cite

Dobbin, Z. C. and Landen, C. N. 2013. Isolation and Characterization of Potential Cancer Stem Cells from Solid Human Tumors—Potential Applications. Current Protocols in Pharmacology. 63:14.28:14.28.1–14.28.19.

Author Information

  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 2 DEC 2013

Abstract

Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cells within a heterogeneous tumor that have enhanced biologic properties, e.g., increased capacity for self-renewal, increased tumorigenicity, enhanced differentiation capacity, and resistance to chemo- and radiotherapies. This unit describes protocols to isolate and characterize potential cancer stem cells from a solid tumor. These involve creating a single-cell suspension from tumor tissue, tagging the cell subpopulations of interest, and sorting them into different populations. The sorted subpopulations can be evaluated for their ability to meet the functional requirements of a CSC, which primarily include increased tumorigenicity in an in vivo xenograft assay. Use of the protocols described in this unit makes it possible to study populations of cells that may have properties of CSCs. Curr. Protoc. Pharmacol. 63:14.28.1-14.28.19. © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Keywords:

  • cancer stem cells;
  • xenograft assay;
  • cell separation and sorting