Unit

UNIT 8.5H Assaying Aspects of Attention and Impulse Control in Mice Using the 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task

  1. Trevor Humby1,
  2. Lawrence Wilkinson1,
  3. Gerry Dawson2

Published Online: 1 MAY 2005

DOI: 10.1002/0471142301.ns0805hs31

Current Protocols in Neuroscience

Current Protocols in Neuroscience

How to Cite

Humby, T., Wilkinson, L. and Dawson, G. 2005. Assaying Aspects of Attention and Impulse Control in Mice Using the 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task. Current Protocols in Neuroscience. 31:8.5H:8.5H.1–8.5H.15.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Neurobiology Programme, The Babraham Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom

  2. 2

    The Neuroscience Research Centre, Merck, Sharp and Dohme, Terlings Park, United Kingdom

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 MAY 2005
  2. Published Print: APR 2005

Abstract

First developed in the 1980s by Trevor Robbins in Cambridge to investigate attentional function in rats, the 5-choice serial reaction time task involves continuous scanning by the subject across a spatial array of visual stimuli. On detecting a brief stimulus at one of five locations, the subject must make a nose poke in order to collect a reward. The task has also been conducted successfully in several strains of mice, including transgenic models. This unit presents the procedures required to run the task in mice, outlining the expected results at each stage of training and presenting examples of the most common manipulations used to dissociate behavior further.