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UNIT 17.5 Sequence, Stability, and Structure of G-Quadruplexes and Their Interactions with Drugs

  1. Yuwei Chen1,
  2. Danzhou Yang1,2,3,4

Published Online: 1 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/0471142700.nc1705s50

Current Protocols in Nucleic Acid Chemistry

Current Protocols in Nucleic Acid Chemistry

How to Cite

Chen, Y. and Yang, D. 2012. Sequence, Stability, and Structure of G-Quadruplexes and Their Interactions with Drugs. Current Protocols in Nucleic Acid Chemistry. 50:17.5:17.5.1–17.5.17.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona

  2. 2

    College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona

  3. 3

    BIO5 Institute, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona

  4. 4

    Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 SEP 2012

Abstract

Although DNA is most widely known for its ability to store and pass along genetic information, the discovery of G-quadruplex structures has illuminated a new role for DNA in biology. DNA G-quadruplexes are four-stranded globular nucleic acid secondary structures formed in specific G-rich sequences with biological significance, such as human telomeres and oncogene promoters. This review focuses on the unimolecular DNA G-quadruplexes, which can readily form in solution under physiological conditions and are considered to be the most biologically relevant. Available structural data show a great conformational diversity of unimolecular G-quadruplexes, which are amenable to small-molecule drug targeting. The relationships between sequence, structure, and stability of unimolecular DNA G-quadruplexes, as well as the recent progress on interactions with small-molecule compounds and insights into rational design of G-quadruplex-interactive molecules, will be discussed. Curr. Protoc. Nucleic Acid Chem. 50:17.5.1-17.5.17. © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Keywords:

  • G-quadruplexes;
  • oncogene promoters;
  • human telomeres;
  • small-molecule interactions;
  • rational drug design