Unit

UNIT 9.7C Use of the A. Victoria Green Fluorescent Protein to Study Protein Dynamics in Vivo

  1. Jason A. Kahana,
  2. Pam A. Silver

Published Online: 1 MAY 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0471142727.mb0907cs34

Current Protocols in Molecular Biology

Current Protocols in Molecular Biology

How to Cite

Kahana, J. A. and Silver, P. A. 2001. Use of the A. Victoria Green Fluorescent Protein to Study Protein Dynamics in Vivo. Current Protocols in Molecular Biology. 34:II:9.7C:9.7.22–9.7.28.

Author Information

  1. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 MAY 2001
  2. Published Print: APR 1996

Abstract

Fluorescent molecules serve as valuable tools for the detection of a variety of biochemical phenomena. Such reagents have been employed for protein localization, quantitation of gene expression, detection of nucleic acids, cell sorting, and determination of chemical concentrations. Although fluorescence is a useful tool for detecting molecules within cells, its application in vivo has heretofore been limited. The ideal vital fluorescent tag should (1) be detectable without causing cytological damage, (2) be able to label a wide variety of cell types readily, and (3) be able to be targeted to virtually any subcellular region. The recently cloned green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is such a molecule. This overview describes the use of this proteinaceous fluorophore for in vivo observation of cellular phenomena, including applications and problems with the use of GFP, a discussion of mutant GFPs with altered fluorescence characteristics, and also some details on microscopy requirements.