Unit

UNIT 8.12 Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH)—Detection of Unbalanced Genetic Aberrations Using Conventional and Micro-Array Techniques

  1. Evelin Schröck1,
  2. Zoë Weaver2,
  3. Donna Albertson3

Published Online: 1 NOV 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0471142956.cy0812s18

Current Protocols in Cytometry

Current Protocols in Cytometry

How to Cite

Schröck, E., Weaver, Z. and Albertson, D. 2001. Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH)—Detection of Unbalanced Genetic Aberrations Using Conventional and Micro-Array Techniques. Current Protocols in Cytometry. 18:8.12:8.12.1–8.12.30.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Genetic Medicine, Charité, Berlin, Germany

  2. 2

    National Cancer Institute (NCI/NIH), Bethesda, Maryland

  3. 3

    University of California, San Francisco, California

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 NOV 2001
  2. Published Print: OCT 2001

Abstract

This unit presents comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), a genome-wide screening technique for genetic aberrations in tumor samples. Specific emphasis is placed on recent applications to the analysis of murine model systems for human cancer. CGH is an invaluable tool for identifying the characteristic genetic rearrangements in these models. The authors discuss an exciting new method currently being developed, array CGH, which results in a tremendous increase in resolution. Oncogene amplifications and deletions of tumor-suppressor genes are detected on a single-gene level. Detailed protocols are supplied for CGH analysis of both human and mouse chromosomes. Keywords: comparative genomic hybridization; tumor genetics; unbalanced chromosomal aberrations; DNA copy number changes; gene amplification; oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; mouse models of human cancer; array technology; array-CGH This unit presents comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), a genome-wide screening technique for genetic aberrations in tumor