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UNIT 4.10 Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (FSM) of Microtubules and Actin in Living Cells

  1. Clare Waterman-Storer

Published Online: 1 FEB 2002

DOI: 10.1002/0471143030.cb0410s13

Current Protocols in Cell Biology

Current Protocols in Cell Biology

How to Cite

Waterman-Storer, C. 2002. Fluorescent Speckle Microscopy (FSM) of Microtubules and Actin in Living Cells. Current Protocols in Cell Biology. 13:4.10:4.10.1–4.10.26.

Author Information

  1. The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 FEB 2002
  2. Published Print: JAN 2002

Abstract

Fluorescent speckle microscopy (FSM), a combination of conventional wide-field fluorescent light microscopy and digital imaging with a low-noise, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, has been developed to allow visualization of assembly/disassembly dynamics, movement, and turnover of macromolecule assemblies in vivo and in vitro. FSM uses a low level of fluorescent subunits to avoid high background. This produces an image of speckled molecules that co-assemble with endogenous molecules and are followed to characterize dynamic events in living cells.