6. Computer Imagery and Multimedia Techniques for Supporting Telemedicine Diagnoses

  1. Metin Akay2 and
  2. Andy Marsh3
  1. Qinglian Guo,
  2. Katsunobu Muroi and
  3. Mieko Ohsuga

Published Online: 9 OCT 2001

DOI: 10.1002/0471206458.ch6

Information Technologies in Medicine: Rehabilitation and Treatment, Volume II

Information Technologies in Medicine: Rehabilitation and Treatment, Volume II

How to Cite

Guo, Q., Muroi, K. and Ohsuga, M. (2001) Computer Imagery and Multimedia Techniques for Supporting Telemedicine Diagnoses, in Information Technologies in Medicine: Rehabilitation and Treatment, Volume II (eds M. Akay and A. Marsh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, USA. doi: 10.1002/0471206458.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Dartmouth College

  2. 3

    National Technical University of Athens

Author Information

  1. Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Tsukaguchi-Honmachi, Amagasaki, Hyogo, JAPAN

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 OCT 2001
  2. Published Print: 13 APR 2001

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471414926

Online ISBN: 9780471206453

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Keywords:

  • computer imagery;
  • telemedicine;
  • multimedia;
  • construction;
  • characteristics;
  • patient image;
  • database management;
  • challenges;
  • VR work desk

Summary

Telemedicine involves delivering medical diagnoses and health-care advice to distant patients. A nurse providing clinical advice over the telephone is the simplest example. Recent telemedicine systems, however, have typically used advanced image and audio capabilities by exploiting ongoing technical advances in communications, imaging, and multimedia.

The object of our current research is to provide medical doctors with patient images in a wider visual field and higher in resolution during a telemedicine diagnosis. To achieve this, computer image processing and multimedia techniques are used in constructing our telemedicine system. The creative functions of this system provide a medical theater with more information about the patient and enable a more effective and accurate telemedicine diagnosis to be carried out.

We discuss the background of this research and describe the limitations and problems of existing telemedicine systems. Then we present a global view of our system construction and highlight its advanced features. Next we present our special devices for inputting (catching) a patient's image and how to automatically composite wide- and high-resolution images from small pieces of images (digital imagery mosaicking techniques). Finally we present our human interface for supporting medical doctors' operations, and discuss the limitations of the system, and give a description of future work.