Correlated Superposition States in Two-Atom Systems

  1. Myron W. Evans
  1. Zbigniew Ficek1 and
  2. Ryszard Tanaś2

Published Online: 13 MAR 2002

DOI: 10.1002/0471231479.ch5

Modern Nonlinear Optics, Part I, Volume 119, Second Edition

Modern Nonlinear Optics, Part I, Volume 119, Second Edition

How to Cite

Ficek, Z. and Tanaś, R. (2001) Correlated Superposition States in Two-Atom Systems, in Modern Nonlinear Optics, Part I, Volume 119, Second Edition (ed M. W. Evans), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, USA. doi: 10.1002/0471231479.ch5

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Physics and Centre for Laser Science, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

  2. 2

    Nonlinear Optics Division, Institute of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań Poland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 13 MAR 2002
  2. Published Print: 28 SEP 2001

Book Series:

  1. Advances in Chemical Physics

Book Series Editors:

  1. I. Prigogine3,4 and
  2. Stuart A. Rice5

Series Editor Information

  1. 3

    Center for Studies in Statistical Mechanics and Complex Systems, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas, USA

  2. 4

    International Solvay Institutes, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium

  3. 5

    Department of Chemistry and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471389309

Online ISBN: 9780471231479

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Keywords:

  • correlated superposition states;
  • two-atom systems;
  • coupled atoms;
  • collective atomic states;
  • selective excitation;
  • entangled states

Summary

Schemes proposed for the preparation of two two-level atoms in an entangled state are reviewed. The authors begin Section II with a derivation of the master equation for two nonidentical two-level atoms interacting with the quantized three-dimensional vacuum field and driven by a single-mode coherent laser field. Sections III and IV are concerned mainly with techniques proposed for the preparation of a two-atom system in entangled states. The cases of maximally and nonmaximally entangled states are discussed. Methods of detecting a particular entangled state are discussed in Section V and preparation of a two-atom system in two-photon entangled states is described in Section VI. A method of mapping of the entanglement of light on atoms is also presented.