Nonstationary Casimir Effect and Analytical Solutions for Quantum Fields in Cavities with Moving Boundaries

  1. Myron W. Evans
  1. V. V. Dodonov1,2

Published Online: 13 MAR 2002

DOI: 10.1002/0471231479.ch7

Modern Nonlinear Optics, Part I, Volume 119, Second Edition

Modern Nonlinear Optics, Part I, Volume 119, Second Edition

How to Cite

Dodonov, V. V. (2001) Nonstationary Casimir Effect and Analytical Solutions for Quantum Fields in Cavities with Moving Boundaries, in Modern Nonlinear Optics, Part I, Volume 119, Second Edition (ed M. W. Evans), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, USA. doi: 10.1002/0471231479.ch7

Author Information

  1. 1

    Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Brazil

  2. 2

    Lebedev Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow, Russia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 13 MAR 2002
  2. Published Print: 28 SEP 2001

Book Series:

  1. Advances in Chemical Physics

Book Series Editors:

  1. I. Prigogine3,4 and
  2. Stuart A. Rice5

Series Editor Information

  1. 3

    Center for Studies in Statistical Mechanics and Complex Systems, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas, USA

  2. 4

    International Solvay Institutes, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium

  3. 5

    Department of Chemistry and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471389309

Online ISBN: 9780471231479

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Keywords:

  • nonstationary Casmir effect;
  • dynamical Casimir effect;
  • electrodynamics;
  • quantum fields;
  • one-dimensional cavity;
  • oscillating boundaries;
  • resonance;
  • photon statistics;
  • nongenerate cavity;
  • damping

Summary

Electrodynamics in vacuum or in media with moving boundaries was the subject of numerous studies in the twentieth century. In this review the author focuses on the problem of cavities with (ideal) reflecting moving boundaries. The “full-space” problem is left aside; the fields are considered to be confined in some limited volume. The chapter begins with a brief historical review of the relevant studies, in the fields of both classical and quantum electrodynamics. For decades different groups of physicists and mathematicians performed studies in their own fields of interest, not suspecting the existence of analogous results in other areas. The author's results are presented and their relevance to further studies on the nonstationary, or dynamical, Casimir effect is discussed.