Chapter 6. Targeting of Adenoviral Gene Therapy Vectors: The Flexibility of Chemical and Molecular Conjugation

  1. David T. Curiel M.D. and
  2. Joanne T. Douglas Ph.D.
  1. Hidde J. Haisma Ph.D. and
  2. Marianne G. Rots Ph.D.

Published Online: 31 MAR 2003

DOI: 10.1002/0471234303.ch6

Vector Targeting for Therapeutic Gene Delivery

Vector Targeting for Therapeutic Gene Delivery

How to Cite

Haisma, H. J. and Rots, M. G. (2003) Targeting of Adenoviral Gene Therapy Vectors: The Flexibility of Chemical and Molecular Conjugation, in Vector Targeting for Therapeutic Gene Delivery (eds D. T. Curiel and J. T. Douglas), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/0471234303.ch6

Editor Information

  1. Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Pathology and Surgery, and the Gene Therapy Center, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Therapeutic Gene Modulation, University Center for Pharmacy, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 MAR 2003
  2. Published Print: 9 AUG 2002

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471434795

Online ISBN: 9780471234302

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Keywords:

  • adenovirus;
  • targeting;
  • gene therapy;
  • peptide;
  • ligand;
  • antibody;
  • polyethylene glycol;
  • bispecific

Summary

Physically targeted adenoviral vectors may be produced by chemical modification of the viral capsid or by the association of a bispecific molecule directed against the viral capsid and the target. Physical modification has the advantage of high flexibility and the readily availability of targeting ligands. The targeted vectors have shown selective gene transfer both in vitro as well as in vivo in animal models. They exhibit a reduction of gene transfer into non-target tissues, i.e. the liver. The increased specificity allows a reduction of dose which in turn should reduce side effects associated with adenoviral administration.