8. Rotor–Stator Mixing Devices

  1. Edward L. Paul2,
  2. Victor A. Atiemo-Obeng3 and
  3. Suzanne M. Kresta4
  1. Victor A. Atiemo-Obeng3 and
  2. Richard V. Calabrese1

Published Online: 30 JAN 2004

DOI: 10.1002/0471451452.ch8

Handbook of Industrial Mixing: Science and Practice

Handbook of Industrial Mixing: Science and Practice

How to Cite

Atiemo-Obeng, V. A. and Calabrese, R. V. (2003) Rotor–Stator Mixing Devices, in Handbook of Industrial Mixing: Science and Practice (eds E. L. Paul, V. A. Atiemo-Obeng and S. M. Kresta), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/0471451452.ch8

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Merck & Co., Inc. (retired); 308 Brooklyn Boulevard, Sea Girt, NJ 08750, USA

  2. 3

    The Dow Chemical Company, Building 1776, Midland, MI 48674, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2G6

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Chemical Engineering, Building 090, Room 2113, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2111, USA

  2. 3

    The Dow Chemical Company, Building 1776, Midland, MI 48674, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 JAN 2004
  2. Published Print: 14 NOV 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471269199

Online ISBN: 9780471451457

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Keywords:

  • Rotor-stator mixers;
  • high shear mixers;
  • colloid mills;
  • mixer geometry;
  • liquid–liquid dispersion;
  • solid–liquid dispersion;
  • emulsification;
  • power draw;
  • scale-up;
  • process design;
  • mechanical design;
  • industrial applications

Summary

This chapter addresses the use of rotor-stator mixing devices in the chemical process industries. While the chapter is mostly practical in its outlook, some attempt is made to relate design and scale-up to process fundamentals. This is difficult since basic knowledge of high shear mixer performance has only recently begun to emerge. An introduction to the subject is followed by a discussion of the geometry and mechanical design of various device types. Hydrodynamic issues are addressed with respect to available data for power draw, pumping capacity and internal flow field details, and their effect on emulsification and dispersion mechanisms. Process scale-up and design for liquid–liquid dispersion, power/solid–liquid dispersion and chemical reaction are also considered. Concluding sections include mechanical design and equipment vendors.