10. Intracellular Protein Trafficking

  1. Stephen R. Bolsover1,
  2. Jeremy S. Hyams2,
  3. Elizabeth A. Shephard3,
  4. Hugh A. White3 and
  5. Claudia G. Wiedemann1

Published Online: 27 JAN 2004

DOI: 10.1002/047146158X.ch10

Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition

Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition

How to Cite

Bolsover, S. R., Hyams, J. S., Shephard, E. A., White, H. A. and Wiedemann, C. G. (2003) Intracellular Protein Trafficking, in Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/047146158X.ch10

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Physiology, University College, London, UK

  2. 2

    Department of Biology, University College, London, UK

  3. 3

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University College, London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 JAN 2004
  2. Published Print: 14 NOV 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471263937

Online ISBN: 9780471461586

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • gated transport;
  • transmembrane translocation;
  • vesicles;
  • sorting signal;
  • targeting sequence;
  • GTPase;
  • rough endoplasmic reticulum;
  • Golgi complex;
  • exocytosis

Summary

Newly synthesized proteins are delivered to their final destination by three different types of transport: gated transport of the folded protein, for example into the nucleus; translocation of the unfolded protein across one or more membranes, for example into the endoplasmic reticulum; or in vesicles along the route from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi and beyond. Sorting signals on the protein bind to receptor proteins which in turn bind to translocation machinery. GTPases regulate many of these translocation steps.