13. Metabolism

  1. Stephen R. Bolsover1,
  2. Jeremy S. Hyams2,
  3. Elizabeth A. Shephard3,
  4. Hugh A. White3 and
  5. Claudia G. Wiedemann1

Published Online: 27 JAN 2004

DOI: 10.1002/047146158X.ch13

Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition

Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition

How to Cite

Bolsover, S. R., Hyams, J. S., Shephard, E. A., White, H. A. and Wiedemann, C. G. (2003) Metabolism, in Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/047146158X.ch13

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Physiology, University College, London, UK

  2. 2

    Department of Biology, University College, London, UK

  3. 3

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University College, London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 JAN 2004
  2. Published Print: 14 NOV 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471263937

Online ISBN: 9780471461586

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Keywords:

  • metabolism;
  • catabolism;
  • anabolism;
  • Krebs cycle;
  • glycolysis;
  • synthesis;
  • carbon fixation;
  • feedback;
  • feedforward

Summary

Metabolism, all the chemical reactions occurring inside a cell, can be divided into catabolism, the breakdown of compounds to release energy, and anabolism which builds and repairs the cell. We describe the Krebs cycle at the center of metabolism and the catabolic reactions that take carbohydrate, fat and amino acids and deliver fuel to the Krebs cycle. We then describe the anabolic reactions that synthesize new glucose, glycogen, fats and amino acids. All these reactions are controlled by mechanisms that utilize the principles of feedback and feedforward.