18. Mechanical Molecules

  1. Stephen R. Bolsover1,
  2. Jeremy S. Hyams2,
  3. Elizabeth A. Shephard3,
  4. Hugh A. White3 and
  5. Claudia G. Wiedemann1

Published Online: 27 JAN 2004

DOI: 10.1002/047146158X.ch18

Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition

Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition

How to Cite

Bolsover, S. R., Hyams, J. S., Shephard, E. A., White, H. A. and Wiedemann, C. G. (2003) Mechanical Molecules, in Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/047146158X.ch18

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Physiology, University College, London, UK

  2. 2

    Department of Biology, University College, London, UK

  3. 3

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University College, London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 JAN 2004
  2. Published Print: 14 NOV 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471263937

Online ISBN: 9780471461586

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Keywords:

  • cytoskeleton;
  • microtubule;
  • cilia;
  • flagella;
  • molecular motor;
  • actin;
  • myosin;
  • intermediate filament;
  • anchoring junction

Summary

Eukaryotic cells are supported by a network of struts and cables called the cytoskeleton, comprising microtubules, actin microfilaments, and intermediate filaments. Motor proteins act on the cytoskeleton to cause movement. Dynein acts on microtubules and is found in cilia and flagella. Dynein and another motor called kinesin transport cargo on cytoplasmic microtubules. Myosin transports cargo on actin and is responsible for muscle contraction. A large number of actin binding proteins control growth and function of the actin cytoskeleton. Anchoring cell junctions connect the cytoskeleton of adjoining cells.