7. Recombinant DNA and Genetic Engineering

  1. Stephen R. Bolsover1,
  2. Jeremy S. Hyams2,
  3. Elizabeth A. Shephard3,
  4. Hugh A. White3 and
  5. Claudia G. Wiedemann1

Published Online: 27 JAN 2004

DOI: 10.1002/047146158X.ch7

Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition

Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition

How to Cite

Bolsover, S. R., Hyams, J. S., Shephard, E. A., White, H. A. and Wiedemann, C. G. (2003) Recombinant DNA and Genetic Engineering, in Cell Biology: A Short Course, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/047146158X.ch7

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Physiology, University College, London, UK

  2. 2

    Department of Biology, University College, London, UK

  3. 3

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University College, London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 JAN 2004
  2. Published Print: 14 NOV 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471263937

Online ISBN: 9780471461586

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Keywords:

  • clone;
  • cDNA;
  • cloning vector;
  • restriction endonuclease;
  • library;
  • sequencing;
  • southern blotting;
  • northern blotting;
  • recombinant protein;
  • polymerase chain reaction;
  • transgenic animals

Summary

In this chapter we describe DNA cloning, both cDNA (complementary to mRNA) and genomic clones. We describe cloning vectors, restriction endonucleases, and clone libraries. DNA clones can be used in many ways: to sequence the gene, for southern or northern blotting, to manufacture or modify recombinant protein, to identify the gene responsible for a disease, or to create transgenic animals. The polymerase chain reaction allows amplification of very small amounts of selected sections of DNA.