5. Intermetallics

  1. James K. Wessel Editor in chief
  1. James K. Wessel2 and
  2. Vinod Sikka1

Published Online: 8 JUN 2004

DOI: 10.1002/0471465186.ch5

Handbook of Advanced Materials: Enabling New Designs

Handbook of Advanced Materials: Enabling New Designs

How to Cite

Wessel, J. K. and Sikka, V. (2004) Intermetallics, in Handbook of Advanced Materials: Enabling New Designs (ed J. K. Wessel), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/0471465186.ch5

Editor Information

  1. Wessel & Associates, 127 Westview Lane, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA

  2. 2

    Wessel & Associates, 127 Westview Lane, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 JUN 2004
  2. Published Print: 16 APR 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471454755

Online ISBN: 9780471465188

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Keywords:

  • intermetallics;
  • nickel aluminide;
  • aluminides;
  • Hastalloy D;
  • wear resistance;
  • carburizing resistance;
  • corrosion resistance;
  • Oak Ridge National Laboratory;
  • US Department of Energy;
  • IC-221M;
  • properties;
  • transfer rolls;
  • furnace trays;
  • Exomelt®

Summary

Intermetallics is the name for a broad class of metals resulting from the combination of various elements including nickel aluminide, titanium aluminide, niobium aluminide, iron aluminide, iron silicide and various other silicides. Each has a unique set of properties. Titanium aluminide is valued for light weight (lower than nickel-based superalloys), oxidation resistance and stiffness. Niobium aluminide is light weight and with a melting point of 2060C operates at higher temperatures than nickel-based superalloys but, has low fracture toughness and poor oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures.

Other silicides are used for their oxidation resistance. All have attractive melting temperatures with some reaching 2400C. They are also used as coatings to protect other materials such as niobium aluminide from oxidation.

Recent improvements in the nickel aluminide composition Ni3Al resulted in a ductile high temperature, strong, hard and thermally stable intermetallic that combines lower density (25% less than super alloys), and resistance to wear, deformation, fatigue, oxidation, carburization and coking.