6. Metal Matrix Composites

  1. James K. Wessel Editor in chief
  1. Chris A. Rodopoulos1 and
  2. James K. Wessel2

Published Online: 8 JUN 2004

DOI: 10.1002/0471465186.ch6

Handbook of Advanced Materials: Enabling New Designs

Handbook of Advanced Materials: Enabling New Designs

How to Cite

Rodopoulos, C. A. and Wessel, J. K. (2004) Metal Matrix Composites, in Handbook of Advanced Materials: Enabling New Designs (ed J. K. Wessel), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/0471465186.ch6

Editor Information

  1. Wessel & Associates, 127 Westview Lane, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, City Campus, Sheffield, United Kingdom S1 1WB

  2. 2

    Wessel & Associates, 127 Westview Lane, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 JUN 2004
  2. Published Print: 16 APR 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471454755

Online ISBN: 9780471465188

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • metal matrix composites;
  • reinforcement;
  • fibers;
  • fibres;
  • matrix;
  • properties;
  • weldability;
  • application;
  • stiffness;
  • wear;
  • thermal conductivity;
  • plasma spray;
  • tapes;
  • powder metallurgy;
  • liquid infiltration;
  • extruding;
  • autoclave;
  • coating;
  • damage tolerance;
  • fatigue;
  • interface;
  • Weibull modulus;
  • residual stresses;
  • damage tolerant design

Summary

Just as plastics and ceramics can be composited, so can metals. One of the newest class of commercially available materials are metal matrix composites (MMCs). These composites are analogous to organic (plastic) and ceramic composites because they are also composed of a reinforcement, usually a fiber, and a matrix. In the case of MMCs, as indicated by the name, the matrix is one or more metals. Metal matrices include aluminum, magnesium, nickel, titanium, copper and other metals. The fiber composition also varies, but the most common are ceramic, usually carbon or silicon carbide. Although they can be reinforced with particulates, MMCs are typically reinforced with fibers in continuous strands or chopped or whisker-like. Because the matrix and fiber selections are many and varied, a wide range of properties result from the many possible formulas. In this chapter the author explores stresses and fatigue, giving the designer some tools to design components of metal matrix composites.