5. Metal Coordination Polymers

  1. Alaa S. Abd-El-Aziz1,
  2. Charles E. Carraher Jr.2,
  3. Charles U. Pittman Jr.3,
  4. John E. Sheats4 and
  5. Martel Zeldin5

Published Online: 30 SEP 2003

DOI: 10.1002/047146659X.ch5

Macromolecules Containing Metal and Metal-Like Elements: A Half-Century of Metal- and Metalloid-Containing Polymers, Volume 1

Macromolecules Containing Metal and Metal-Like Elements: A Half-Century of Metal- and Metalloid-Containing Polymers, Volume 1

How to Cite

Abd-El-Aziz, A. S., Carraher, C. E., Pittman, C. U., Sheats, J. E. and Zeldin, M. (2003) Metal Coordination Polymers, in Macromolecules Containing Metal and Metal-Like Elements: A Half-Century of Metal- and Metalloid-Containing Polymers, Volume 1, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/047146659X.ch5

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Chemistry, The University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

  2. 2

    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida, USA

  3. 3

    Department of Chemistry, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi, USA

  4. 4

    Department of Chemistry, Rider University, Lawrenceville, New Jersey, USA

  5. 5

    Department of Chemistry, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, New York, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 SEP 2003
  2. Published Print: 5 SEP 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471458326

Online ISBN: 9780471466598

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Keywords:

  • metal coordination polymers;
  • porphyrins;
  • phthalocyanies;
  • pyridine containing polymers;
  • benzimidazoles;
  • Schiff base polymers;
  • star polymers (macromolecules);
  • dendrimers

Summary

Coordination macromolecules of the metalloenzyme class are responsible for life through their role in photosynthesis and respiration. There exists a wide variety of coordination polymers utilizing nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur as the “chelating” atoms. These macromolecules are generally made by introducing the metal-containing unit during the formal polymer forming sequence. In such cases the polymer is formed through chelation with the metal, through inclusion of the metal-containing unit in the polymer forming step where the connective sequence is removed from the metal, or through introduction of the metal to already formed macromolecular structures.

Coordinating groups include porphyrins (as present in hemoglobin), Schiff bases, phthalocyanines, and pyridine related systems but any appropriate Lewis base can be utilized as the chelating agent. The metal atoms are included in macromolecular systems, typically through σ bonding but metals can also be attached through other bonding avenues. The metal-containing unit may be neutral or it may contain a net charge and thus exist as a salt.

As with other metal-containing systems, the polymer architecture can be linear, two- and three-dimensional, star, dendritic or “shish kebab”. The metal containing unit may be oriented along the main chain or as an appendage, or in some combination of placements. In general, such products exhibit fairly high glass and melting points and poor solubilities. The structures are also generally not as stable in solution as some other metal-containing systems, such as those described in Chapter 4, due to the ready reversibility of the metal-chelate atom bond. Some of the materials exhibit optical non-linearity, electrical conductivity, charge-carrier ability, photo-activity, and luminescence.