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Occurrence of Organochlorine Pesticides in Vegetables Grown on Untreated Soils from an Agricultural Watershed

Agricultural Water

  1. Mariana Gonzalez1,
  2. Karina S. B. Miglioranza2,
  3. Julia E. Aizpún De Moreno3,
  4. Víctor J. Moreno3

Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047147844X.aw1503

Water Encyclopedia

Water Encyclopedia

How to Cite

Gonzalez, M., Miglioranza, K. S. B., De Moreno, J. E. A. and Moreno, V. J. 2005. Occurrence of Organochlorine Pesticides in Vegetables Grown on Untreated Soils from an Agricultural Watershed. Water Encyclopedia. 3:643–647.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Mar del Plata, Argentina

  2. 2

    Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina

  3. 3

    Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Mar del Plata, Argentina

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

Abstract

Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) are compounds of particular concern in the environment because of their recalcitrance, global transport, distribution, and toxicity, which lead to include them into the group of persistent organic pollutants. The impact of soil contaminants on human health and accumulation in food crops is relevant because of increased dietary exposure of consumers. Organic agriculture has developed rapidly during the last decade on the assumption that such food is free of synthetic pesticides. Although it is likely that lower pesticide residues are found in organically grown vegetables, it has been demonstrated that these produce can reach similar pesticide levels to those conventionally grown. Topographic position, wind dispersion, and neighboring farms are the main factors affecting organic products. Moreover, the use of pine needles as soil amendments can enhance the OCP levels, because they are known to accumulate highly lipophilic pollutants from the atmosphere. Vegetables grown on untreated soils accumulated OCPs efficiently from both air and soil. The main pesticides found involved, endosulfans currently in use, DDTs and HCHs, which are banned or restricted. All OCP levels were below the maximum residue limits (MRL) considered by the Codex Alimentarius. Therefore, ecosystem factors, such as pesticide runoff, drift from pesticide used by neighboring farming, volatilization, leaching, and wash out, impact on the occurrence of OCPs in vegetables grown on untreated soils.

Keywords:

  • organochlorine pesticides;
  • contamination;
  • vegetables;
  • untreated soils;
  • volatilization;
  • atmospheric transport;
  • organic produces