8. Selection, Assignment, and Correlations of Atomic Electron Affinities

  1. E. C. M. Chen and
  2. E. S. D. Chen

Published Online: 19 APR 2004

DOI: 10.1002/0471659894.ch8

The Electron Capture Detector and the Study of Reactions with Thermal Electrons

The Electron Capture Detector and the Study of Reactions with Thermal Electrons

How to Cite

Chen, E. C. M. and Chen, E. S. D. (2004) Selection, Assignment, and Correlations of Atomic Electron Affinities, in The Electron Capture Detector and the Study of Reactions with Thermal Electrons, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/0471659894.ch8

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 APR 2004
  2. Published Print: 16 APR 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471326229

Online ISBN: 9780471659891

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Keywords:

  • atomic electron affinities;
  • random errors;
  • systematic errors;
  • periodic table;
  • Mulliken electronegativities;
  • work functions;
  • atomic anionic clusters precision and accuracy plots

Summary

The electron affinities, Ea of the main group atoms are the most precisely measured values. The random uncertainties of some atomic Ea determined from photodetachment thresholds are in parts per million. These are confirmed by photoelectron spectroscopy, surface ionization, ion pair formation, and the Born Haber cycle. Atomic electron affinities illustrate the procedure for evaluating experimental Ea. Random and systematic errors are characteristics of the method not the values. Random errors can be determined by repeating the experiment. Systematic errors can only be determined by comparisons of values determined by different methods. Uncertainties can be estimated from precision and accuracy plots if it is assumed that there are only random errors. The Ea of the d and f block elements, electronegativities and the work functions of the elements will be evaluated in this chapter using this procedure. The extrapolation of values in the periodic table for the main group elements can be examined and applied to the transition elements. The evaluated values can be combined with ionization potentials to obtain Mulliken electronegativities. These can be correlated with other electronegativities and the work functions of the elements. This provides another example of the use of the periodic table to evaluate and predict values.