Standard Article

Supercritical Technologies for Further Processing of Edible Oils

  1. Feral Temelli,
  2. Özlem Güçlü-Üstündağ

Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047167849X.bio057

Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products

Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products

How to Cite

Temelli, F. and Güçlü-Üstündağ, Ö. 2005. Supercritical Technologies for Further Processing of Edible Oils. Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products. 5:10.

Author Information

  1. University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

Abstract

Supercritical CO2(SCCO2) processing of fats and oils has been widely investigated because SCCO2 offers an environmentally friendly alternative for the processing of fats and oils with added advantages such as moderate operating conditions and solvent-free extracts and residues. From a processing perspective, a unique advantage of SCCO2 processing lies in its versatility, which results from the ability to modify solvent properties by changing operating conditions (temperature and pressure) or by the addition of cosolvents. A good understanding of the fundamentals of solubility behavior of lipid components in SCCO2 as affected by operating conditions and solute properties is required to realize its full potential in fats and oils processing. The operational flexibility offered by supercritical fluid technology enables the processor to fine tune solvent properties and to develop novel processes by the integration of unit operations of extraction, fractionation, and reaction to meet the process objectives. Supercritical fluid extraction, fractionation, and reaction protocols have been effectively used for the extraction and refining of oils, concentration of bioactive components from oils or oil byproducts, modification of physical properties of fats and oils, production of oleochemicals, and analytical applications.

Keywords:

  • extraction;
  • fats;
  • fractionation;
  • oils;
  • processing;
  • reaction;
  • supercritical carbon dioxide