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Cooking Oils, Salad Oils, and Dressings

  1. Steven E. Hill,
  2. R. G. Krishnamurthy

Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

DOI: 10.1002/047167849X.bio058

Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products

Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products

How to Cite

Hill, S. E. and Krishnamurthy, R. G. 2005. Cooking Oils, Salad Oils, and Dressings. Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products. 4:6.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUL 2005

Abstract

Lipids used in food products have been conventionally divided into two classes based on their consistency at about 25°C (72°F): (1) liquid oils and (2) solid and semisolid fats. Edible oils can be further divided by their general usage in food, as cooking oil or as salad oil. These types of oils can be characterized by a wide variety of measures that assess attributes such as quality, stability, and nutritional value. Cooking oils are in considerable demand for use in applications such as deep-fat frying of many food products or in other uses where exposure to higher temperature is desired. However, salad oils are not generally used in applications where the oil is exposed to heat; rather this oil type finds application in foods that are shelf stable or refrigerated. One large food use of salad oils is for dressings. Oil-based dressings are divided into two broad categories by their texture: spoonable dressings (salad dressings, mayonnaise) and pourable dressings.

Keywords:

  • oil;
  • dressings;
  • salad