3. Artificial DNA through Metal-Mediated Base Pairing: Structural Control and Discrete Metal Assembly

  1. Alaa S. Abd-El-Aziz2,
  2. Charles E. Carraher Jr.3,
  3. Charles U. Pittman Jr.4,
  4. John E. Sheats5 and
  5. Martel Zeldin6
  1. Mitsuhiko Shionoya

Published Online: 28 JUL 2004

DOI: 10.1002/0471683779.ch3

Macromolecules Containing Metal and Metal-Like Elements: Biomedical Applications, Volume 3

Macromolecules Containing Metal and Metal-Like Elements: Biomedical Applications, Volume 3

How to Cite

Shionoya, M. (2004) Artificial DNA through Metal-Mediated Base Pairing: Structural Control and Discrete Metal Assembly, in Macromolecules Containing Metal and Metal-Like Elements: Biomedical Applications, Volume 3 (eds A. S. Abd-El-Aziz, C. E. Carraher, C. U. Pittman, J. E. Sheats and M. Zeldin), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/0471683779.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Chemistry, The University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

  2. 3

    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida and Florida Center for Environmental Studies, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, USA

  3. 4

    Department of Chemistry, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi, USA

  4. 5

    Department of Chemistry, Rider University, Lawrenceville, New Jersey, USA

  5. 6

    Department of Chemistry, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, New York, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JUL 2004
  2. Published Print: 18 JUN 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471667377

Online ISBN: 9780471683773

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Keywords:

  • artificial DNA;
  • metallo-DNA;
  • base pairing;
  • metal array;
  • self-assembly;
  • metal complex

Summary

DNA shows promise as a provider of a structural basis for the “bottom–up” fabrication of inorganic and bioorganic molecular devices. In particular, the DNA base replacement for alternative base pairing could possibly provide many versatile tools for reengineering DNA as well as biological applications. This review focuses on recent approaches to the replacement of hydrogen-bonded DNA base pairs by alternative ones including metal-based strategy directed toward self-assembled metal arrays within DNAs.