16. Integration of Discovery and Development: The Role of Genomics and Proteomics

  1. Rodney J. Y. Ho Ph.D. and
  2. Milo Gibaldi Ph.D.

Published Online: 29 OCT 2004

DOI: 10.1002/0471704210.ch16

Biotechnology and Biopharmaceuticals: Transforming Proteins and Genes into Drugs

Biotechnology and Biopharmaceuticals: Transforming Proteins and Genes into Drugs

How to Cite

Ho, R. J. Y. and Gibaldi, M. (2003) Integration of Discovery and Development: The Role of Genomics and Proteomics, in Biotechnology and Biopharmaceuticals: Transforming Proteins and Genes into Drugs, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/0471704210.ch16

Author Information

  1. University of Washington School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutics, Seattle, Washington, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 29 OCT 2004
  2. Published Print: 20 JUN 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471206903

Online ISBN: 9780471704218

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Keywords:

  • genomics;
  • proteomics;
  • integration;
  • sequences;
  • drug targets;
  • proteomics;
  • functions;
  • tools

Summary

It is only a matter of time until technological advances, the continuous accumulation of genomic data, and innovations in proteomics have significant impact beyond drug discovery. The human genome sequencing project is in the final stages, and now we need to begin putting the name with the face, by identifying the functions of proteins that newly discovered genes encode. Capitalizing on human genomic information, scientists introduced a new area of research called proteomics. Proteomics is beginning to blossom and holds promise for rapid expansion of drug targets. Proteomics, though still in its infancy, will increase our ability to efficiently identify functionally important proteins encoded by the nucleotide sequences of putative genes for therapeutic use or for use as drug targets. Many of these newly identified targets still lack information on how and when they act in cells and whole living systems. It is clear that a cross-discipline, team approach will be needed to anticipate, early in the drug development process, how newly identified molecular targets and molecular entities may behave in living systems. Maturation of genomics and proteomics along with integration of sciences involved in drug discovery and development will allow weeding out of drug candidates with poor drug-like properties and unacceptable safety profiles early in the research and development process. A successful integration of discovery and development with the help of effective and efficient tools developed to study genomics and proteomics is likely to reduce costs and increase the number of novel drugs produced each year by research-based pharmaceutical companies.