4. Other Devices and High Technology Solutions

  1. William C. Mann PhD Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy Director, Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology and Aging
  1. Shin-Yi Lin M.S., OT

Published Online: 27 JUN 2005

DOI: 10.1002/0471743941.ch4

Smart Technology for Aging, Disability, and Independence: The State of the Science

Smart Technology for Aging, Disability, and Independence: The State of the Science

How to Cite

Lin, S.-Y. (2005) Other Devices and High Technology Solutions, in Smart Technology for Aging, Disability, and Independence: The State of the Science (ed W. C. Mann), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/0471743941.ch4

Editor Information

  1. University of Florida, PO Box 100164, Gainesville, FL 32610-0164, USA

Author Information

  1. University of Florida, Ph.D. Program in Rehabilitation Science, PO Box 100164, Gainesville, FL 32610-0164, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 JUN 2005
  2. Published Print: 24 JUN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780471696940

Online ISBN: 9780471743941

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Keywords:

  • high-tech assistive technology;
  • visual impairment;
  • hearing impairment;
  • physical impairment;
  • cognitive impairment;
  • aging;
  • ADL;
  • IADL

Summary

This Chapter discusses high-technology assistive devices, excluding smart home technology, assistive robotics, and telehealth devices, which are covered in Chapters 2, 3, and 5. High-technology assistive devices usually refer to devices that are more expensive, more difficult to make, and hard to obtain items1. The high technology devices discussed in this chapter range from devices that assist daily living activities to devices that allow opportunities of social interaction and participation for people with disabilities. These devices include those commercially available and others that are still being developed. Some devices are designed for people with disabilities; while others are marketed for the mainstream population, yet can be used to accommodate disabling conditions. We group these devices in categories based on the primary type of impairment they address, including vision, hearing, mobility and movement, and cognition. In each category, we discussed devices used for different tasks.