Lobular carcinoma in situ of the breast(Long-term followup

Authors

  • James E. Wheeler MD,

    Assistant Professor of Pathology, Corresponding author
    1. The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
    • Division of Surgical Pathology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104
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  • H. T. Enterline MD,

    Professor of Pathology
    1. The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
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  • James M. Roseman MD,

    1. The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
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    • Resident in Surgery.

  • Joseph P. Tomasulo MD,

    1. The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
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    • Dept. of Pathology, University of California, Irvine.

  • Cheryl H. McIlvaine BSc,

    1. The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
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    • Dept. of Biometrics, Temple University.

  • William T. Fitts Jr. MD,

    Professor of Surgery
    1. The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
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  • James Kirshenbaum

    1. The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
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    • Harvard University.


Abstract

Ninety-eight women with lobular carcinoma in situ (LICS) of the breast were identified over a 16-year period. Consecutive slide review of all breast material over a 12-year period identified 25 women with LCIS on biopsy who did not undergo mastectomy. Only 1 woman (4%) in a complete followup averaging 17.5 years developed ipsilateral invasive carcinoma. of 32 women with a contralateral breast at risk, 3 (9.7%) developed infiltrating carcinoma. LCIS was found with infiltrating carcinoma, especially of the lobular (small cell) type, with such frequency as to indicate a close relationship. However, the risk of subsequent development of infiltrating carcinoma in the breast with biopsyproven LCIS is shown to be substantially less than indicated by previous authors. This suggests that careful and prolonged followup may suffice for the woman whose breast biopsy contains lobular carcinoma in situ.

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