Serum pesticide levels in patients with chiLDHOOD COLORECTAL CARCINOMA

Authors

  • Glyn G. Caldwell MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia
    • Cancer Branch, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333
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    • Chief, Cancer Branch, Chronic Diseases Division, Bureau of Epidemiology, Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia.

  • Shanklin B. Cannon MD,

    1. Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia
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    • Formerly Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, Center for Disease Control. Now resident in medicine, Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas.

  • Charles B. Pratt MD,

    1. Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia
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    • Member in Clinical Therapeutics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.

  • Robert D. Arthur PhD

    1. Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia
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    • Formerly Project Director, Mississippi Epidemiologic Studies Program, Mississippi State Chemical Laboratory, Mississippi State, Mississippi 39762. Now Assistant Professor, Department of Animal Industries, Southern Illinois University of Carbondale, Illinois.


Abstract

From September 1974 through November 1976, 13 adolescent patients with mucin-producing colorectal adenocarcinoma were treated at a Memphis, Tennessee, pediatric oncology center. Ten of these children were from the rural areas of the Mississippi Delta, areas of high pesticide use. None of them had a family history of colorectal cancer, familial polyposis, or ulcerative colitis. Levels of pesticide residues, however, were not generally higher in blood samples from patients and their families than from controls.

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