Cancer screening. Knowledge, recommendations, and practices of physicians

Authors

  • David V. Schapira M.B.Ch.B., F.R.C.P.(C),

    Corresponding author
    1. Section of Cancer Prevention, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, and University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida
    • H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612–9497
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  • Rubens J. Pamies M.D.,

    1. Section of Cancer Prevention, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, and University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida
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  • Nagi B. Kumar R.D., Ph.D.,

    1. Section of Cancer Prevention, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, and University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida
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  • Arthur H. Herold M.D.,

    1. Section of Cancer Prevention, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, and University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida
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  • Daniel J. Van Durme M.D.,

    1. Section of Cancer Prevention, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, and University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida
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  • Laurie J. Woodward M.D.,

    1. Section of Cancer Prevention, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, and University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida
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  • Richard G. Roetzheim M.D.

    1. Section of Cancer Prevention, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, and University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida
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Abstract

Background. Americans visit their primary care physicians several times a year. These visits provide physicians with many opportunities to reduce cancer risk in their patients by recommending periodic cancer screening. There is evidence of noncompliance among primary care physicians and their patients with regard to periodic cancer screening. Barriers to screening may be perceived by physicians and patients.

Results. The authors found that when physicians recommended cancer screening tests, the compliance among patients was relatively high.

Conclusion. Primary care physicians can take the opportunity to recommend cancer screening tests during routine patient visits, and this strategy may well increase cancer screening rates in the population.

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