Central neurocytomas express photoreceptor differentiation

Authors

  • Hernando Mena M.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neuropathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC
    • Medical Corps, United States Army, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Department of Neuropathology, 6825 16th Street N.W., Bldg. 54 Room G051, Washington, DC 20306-6000
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  • Alan L. Morrison M.D.,

    1. Department of Neuropathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC
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  • Robert V. Jones M.D.,

    1. Department of Neuropathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Pathology, George Washington University Medical Center, 2300 Eye Street, N.W., Washington, DC, 20037
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    • Fax: (202) 994-7250

  • Kymberly A. Gyure M.D.

    1. Department of Neuropathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Pathology, University of Maryland Medical System, 22 South Green Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1595
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    • Fax: (410) 328-5508


  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  • The opinions or assertions expressed herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Departments of the Army, Navy, or the Department of Defense.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Central neurocytomas are composed of mature neuronal elements, frequently arranged in rosettes similar to those present in pineocytomas. This suggests the possibility of similar patterns of differentiation, including photoreceptor differentiation. The authors analyzed the immunoreactivity of central neurocytomas for retinal S-antigen, neuronal, glial, and neuroendocrine markers.

METHODS

Thirty-three central neurocytomas were analyzed with reference to their clinicopathologic characteristics, immunoreactivity, and the possibility that anaplastic histologic features correlated with aggressive clinical behavior.

RESULTS

There were 18 male and 15 female patients. The median age at diagnosis was 30 years (range, 3–69 years). All of the tumors with specified location were related to the ventricles. Thirty-two tumors were diagnosed at surgery and 1 at autopsy. Histologic features included mineralization (20 of 33), foci of necrosis (4 of 33), chronic inflammation (4 of 33), ganglion cell differentiation (1 of 33), and lipomatous differentiation (1 of 33). None of the lesions had significant nuclear pleomorphism, mitotic activity, or vascular endothelial proliferation. Immunohistochemistry included expression of synaptophysin (33 of 33), neuron specific enolase (31 of 33), S-100 protein (25 of 33), retinal S-antigen (14 of 24), somatostatin (8 of 27), glial fibrillary acidic protein (4 of 33), neurofilament protein (3 of 22), and leucine enkephalin (1 of 27). At follow-up, 15 of 23 patients were alive an average of 8.1 years (range, 0.91–35.9 years) after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Central neurocytomas behave as slowly growing neoplasms that remain confined within one or several supratentorial ventricles and are associated with long survival after surgical excision. Malignant forms with aggressive clinical behavior were not found. The neoplastic cells can express photoreceptor differentiation possibly relating central neurocytomas to pineocytomas. Adipocyte differentiation may be present, and the possibility of a relation between the central neurocytoma and cerebellar liponeurocytoma should be entertained. Cancer 2001;91:136–43. Published 2001 American Cancer Society.

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