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Cancer

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Supplement: Cancer Rehabilitation in the New Millennium

15 August 2001

Volume 92, Issue S4

Pages 969–1057

  1. Introduction

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Original Articles
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      Introduction (page 969)

      Richard Payne, Juan Santiago-Palma and Andrea Cheville

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<969::AID-CNCR1407>3.0.CO;2-6

  2. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Introduction
    3. Original Articles
    1. General Topic

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      A history of cancer rehabilitation (pages 970–974)

      Joel A. DeLisa

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<970::AID-CNCR1408>3.0.CO;2-T

      An examination of the history of cancer rehabilitation will steer us toward future success for our patients. It is important that past lessons direct us away from impeding pitfalls.

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      Cancer rehabilitation into the future (pages 975–979)

      Lynn H. Gerber

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<975::AID-CNCR1409>3.0.CO;2-B

      Cancer is often associated with complex management issues. Treatment must utilize a model of chronic disease care that addresses all phases of the illness.

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      Lymphedema : Strategies for management (pages 980–987)

      Sara R. Cohen, David K. Payne and Richard S. Tunkel

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<980::AID-CNCR1410>3.0.CO;2-E

      Various strategies are currently available for the management of lymphedema, a condition that arises following treatment for cancer. An overview of treatment techniques is presented in this article, including a discussion of both physical and psychologic aspects of the disease.

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      Strategies for managing cancer-related fatigue syndrome : A rehabilitation approach (pages 988–997)

      Maryl L. Winningham

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<988::AID-CNCR1411>3.0.CO;2-O

      Cancer-related fatigue syndrome (CRFS) affects patients of all ages and reflects a broad variety of cancer-related sequelae. This report addresses the multifactorial nature of CRFS by discussing several promising rehabilitative interventions and the rationale for each.

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      Rehabilitation following bone marrow transplantation (pages 998–1007)

      Theresa A. Gillis and Eileen S. Donovan

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<998::AID-CNCR1412>3.0.CO;2-K

      Bone marrow transplantation is increasingly utilized for a variety of oncologic, hematologic, and other disorders. Patients experience declines in functional independence as a result of the transplantation; these may be ameliorated by the addition of rehabilitative interventions throughout the treatment program.

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      Sexuality rehabilitation (pages 1008–1012)

      Alfred L. McKee Jr. and Leslie R. Schover

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<1008::AID-CNCR1413>3.0.CO;2-2

      Sexual dysfunction is common in patients undergoing active cancer treatment as well as cancer survivors. Identifying sexual problems requires appropriate interview techniques, but for many patients treatment of these problems can minimize dysfunction and improve physical intimacy.

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      Rehabilitation for limb salvage patients : Kinesiologic parameters and psychologic assessment (pages 1013–1019)

      Joseph M. Lane, Grace H. Christ, Safdar N. Khan and Sherry I. Backus

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<1013::AID-CNCR1414>3.0.CO;2-D

      In this article the authors review the kinesiologic patterns and psychosocial profiles of patients with osteosarcoma treated with either limb salvage or amputation.

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      Bone metastasis and rehabilitation (pages 1020–1028)

      Robert W. Bunting and Bernadette Shea

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<1020::AID-CNCR1415>3.0.CO;2-I

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      Problems encountered in attempting to rehabilitate patients with bony metastases are reviewed in this article. However, it has been found that patients with these metastases can be safely and effectively rehabilitated.

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      Rehabilitation of persons with central nervous system tumors (pages 1029–1038)

      Steven Kirshblum, Michael W. O'Dell, Chester Ho and Karen Barr

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<1029::AID-CNCR1416>3.0.CO;2-P

      As treatment for cancer of the central nervous system (CNS) improves, the role of rehabilitation specialists will expand. The goal of rehabilitation is to prevent complications, maximize the functional capabilities of the patient, and improve his or her quality of life.

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      Rehabilitation of patients with advanced cancer (pages 1039–1048)

      Andrea Cheville

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<1039::AID-CNCR1417>3.0.CO;2-L

      Rehabilitation can preserve or restore function in advanced cancer patients. Pathways and referral patterns need to be established so that timely and appropriate functional restoration may occur.

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      Palliative care and rehabilitation (pages 1049–1052)

      Juan Santiago-Palma and Richard Payne

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<1049::AID-CNCR1418>3.0.CO;2-H

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      When patients are terminally ill, both symptom control and maintenance of function become central aspects of their treatment. Palliative care and rehabilitation are part of the comprehensive medical care of these patients.

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      Cancer rehabilitation services in a tertiary care center (pages 1053–1054)

      Kenley D. Schmidt

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<1053::AID-CNCR1419>3.0.CO;2-V

      Patients with cancer have a wide array of rehabilitation needs that are often overlooked. A “team” approach used at the Mayo Clinic has been successful in meeting many of the cancer patient's psychosocial and discharge planning needs.

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      Integrating cancer rehabilitation into medical care at a cancer hospital (pages 1055–1057)

      Martin Grabois

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2001 | DOI: 10.1002/1097-0142(20010815)92:4+<1055::AID-CNCR1420>3.0.CO;2-E

      This article reviews attempts to establish and successfully implement a cancer rehabilitation program at the Texas Medical Center and the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

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