The significance of subgroups of bulimia and anorexia nervosa: Lifetime frequency of psychiatric disorders

Authors

  • Reinhold G. Laessle Ph.D.,

    1. Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, where Karl M. Pirke is head of the Division of Psychoneuroendocrinology and Hans U. Wittchen is head of the Division of Evaluation Research
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  • Hans U. Wittchen Ph.D.,

    1. Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, where Karl M. Pirke is head of the Division of Psychoneuroendocrinology and Hans U. Wittchen is head of the Division of Evaluation Research
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  • Manfred M. Fichter M.D.,

    1. Lecturer in Psychopathology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich and director of the Psychosomatic Hospital Roseneck in Prien/Chiemsee
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  • Karl M. Pirke M.D.

    Corresponding author
    1. Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, where Karl M. Pirke is head of the Division of Psychoneuroendocrinology and Hans U. Wittchen is head of the Division of Evaluation Research
    • Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Division of Psychoneuroendocrinology, Kraepelinstr. 10, 8000 München 40, FRG
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Abstract

By a standardized interview DSM-III lifetime diagnoses were assessed in 91 eating disorders patients who were divided in four subgroups. Anorectic patients with bulimic symptoms and normal-weight bulimic patients with and without a history of anorexia nervosa had a similar history of additional psychiatric diagnoses. In general, restricting anorexics showed lower lifetime rates of psychiatric disorders than patients with bulimic symptomatology. Minor affective disorders, however, were equally distributed across all four groups.

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