Binge eating disorder, retention, and dropout in an adult obesity program

Authors

  • Dr. Karen S. I. Ho R.D., Dr.P.H.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Research Instructor, Department of General Internal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine at Houston
    • Department of General Medicine, 1504 Taub Loop, 2RM-081-001, Houston, TX 77030
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  • Milton Z. Nichaman M.D., Sc.D.,

    1. Professor of Epidemiology, Human Nutrition Center, School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
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  • Wendell C. Taylor Ph.D., M.P.H.,

    1. Assistant Professor of Behavioral Sciences, Center for Health Promotion, Research and Development, School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
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  • Eun Sul Lee Ph.D.,

    1. Professor of Biometry, University of Texas Health Science Center, School of Public Health, Houston
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  • John P. Foreyt Ph.D.

    Professor
    1. Department of Medicine, Director, Nutrition Research Clinic, Baylor College of Medicine at Houston
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Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with dropout in a weight reduction program among obese, nonpurging binge and nonbinge eaters. Method: We categorized 156 obese, nonpurging women previously randomized to a behavior modification-based (BM) or a food addiction theory-based (FD) weight reduction intervention by binge status using the DSM-IV criteria for binge eating disorder (BED). Subjects were monitored prospectively for dropout during the 6-month intervention period. Results: Results of a Cox proportional hazards survival analysis indicated binge status had a statistically significant (p = .04) protective effect against dropout. Binge eaters were half as likely to dropout versus nonbinge eaters. Discussion: We conclude that (1) the DSM-IV criteria for BED is a useful method of classifying obese individuals in weight loss interventions and (2) the identification of subgroups among obese subjects is an important step in understanding retention in weight loss programs. Future research can confirm this finding. © 1995 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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