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Iron Compounds

  1. Egon Wildermuth1,
  2. Hans Stark2,
  3. Gabriele Friedrich3,
  4. Franz Ludwig Ebenhöch4,
  5. Brigitte Kühborth5,
  6. Jack Silver6,
  7. Rafael Rituper7

Published Online: 15 JUN 2000

DOI: 10.1002/14356007.a14_591

Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry

Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry

How to Cite

Wildermuth, E., Stark, H., Friedrich, G., Ebenhöch, F. L., Kühborth, B., Silver, J. and Rituper, R. 2000. Iron Compounds. Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. .

Author Information

  1. 1

    Leverkusen, Federal Republic of Germany

  2. 2

    BASF Aktiengesellschaft, Ludwigshafen, Federal Republic of Germany

  3. 3

    BASF Aktiengesellschaft, Ludwigshafen, Federal Republic of Germany

  4. 4

    BASF Aktiengesellschaft, Ludwigshafen, Federal Republic of Germany

  5. 5

    BASF Aktiengesellschaft, Ludwigshafen, Federal Republic of Germany

  6. 6

    University of Essex, Colchester, United Kingdom

  7. 7

    Keramchemie GmbH, Siershahn, Federal Republic of Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUN 2000

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Abstract

The article contains sections titled:

1.Iron Sulfates
1.1.Iron(II) Sulfate
1.2.Iron(III) Sulfate
2.Iron Chlorides
2.1.Iron(III) Chloride
2.2.Iron(II) Chloride
3.Iron Pentacarbonyl
3.1.Properties
3.2.Production
3.3.Quality Specifications and Analysis
3.4.Safety, Storage, and Transportation
3.5.Uses
3.6.Economic Aspects
3.7.Toxicology and OccupationalHealth
4.Iron Compounds, Miscellaneous
5.Iron Compounds for the Treatment of Anemia
6.Regeneration of Iron-Containing PicklingBaths
6.1.Sulfuric Acid Pickling Solutions
6.1.1.Crystallization
6.1.2.Electrolysis
6.2.Hydrochloric Acid Pickling Solutions
6.3.Nitric and Hydrofluoric Acid Pickling Solutions