Intervention Review

Combined inhaled anticholinergics and short-acting beta2-agonists for initial treatment of acute asthma in children

  1. Benedict Griffiths1,*,
  2. Francine M Ducharme2,3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Airways Group

Published Online: 21 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 18 APR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000060.pub2

How to Cite

Griffiths B, Ducharme FM. Combined inhaled anticholinergics and short-acting beta2-agonists for initial treatment of acute asthma in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD000060. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000060.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    St Thomas' Hospital, Evelina Children's Hospital, London, UK

  2. 2

    University of Montreal, Department of Paediatrics, Montreal, Québec, Canada

  3. 3

    CHU Sainte-Justine, Research Centre, Montreal, Canada

*Benedict Griffiths, Evelina Children's Hospital, St Thomas' Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7EH, UK. bgriffiths@doctors.org.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 21 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

There are several treatment options for managing acute asthma exacerbations (sustained worsening of symptoms that do not subside with regular treatment and require a change in management). Guidelines advocate the use of inhaled short acting beta2-agonists (SABAs) in children experiencing an asthma exacerbation. Anticholinergic agents, such as ipratropium bromide and atropine sulfate, have a slower onset of action and weaker bronchodilating effect, but may specifically relieve cholinergic bronchomotor tone and decrease mucosal edema and secretions. Therefore, the combination of inhaled anticholinergics with SABAs may yield enhanced and prolonged bronchodilation.

Objectives

To determine whether the addition of inhaled anticholinergics to SABAs provides clinical improvement and affects the incidence of adverse effects in children with acute asthma exacerbations.

Search methods

We searched MEDLINE (1966 to April 2000), EMBASE (1980 to April 2000), CINAHL (1982 to April 2000) and reference lists of studies of previous versions of this review. We also contacted drug manufacturers and trialists. For the 2012 review update, we undertook an 'all years' search of the Cochrane Airways Group's register on the 18 April 2012.

Selection criteria

Randomized parallel trials comparing the combination of inhaled anticholinergics and SABAs with SABAs alone in children (aged 18 months to 18 years) with an acute asthma exacerbation.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used the GRADE rating system to assess the quality of evidence for our primary outcome (hospital admission).

Main results

Twenty trials met the review eligibility criteria, generated 24 study comparisons and comprised 2697 randomised children aged one to 18 years, presenting predominantly with moderate or severe exacerbations. Most studies involved both preschool-aged children and school-aged children; three studies also included a small proportion of infants less than 18 months of age. Nine trials (45%) were at a low risk of bias. Most trials used a fixed-dose protocol of three doses of 250 mcg or two doses of 500 mcg of nebulized ipratropium bromide in combination with a SABA over 30 to 90 minutes while three trials used a single dose and two used a flexible-dose protocol according to the need for SABA.

The addition of an anticholinergic to a SABA significantly reduced the risk of hospital admission (risk ratio (RR) 0.73; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63 to 0.85; 15 studies, 2497 children, high-quality evidence). In the group receiving only SABAs, 23 out of 100 children with acute asthma were admitted to hospital compared with 17 (95% CI 15 to 20) out of 100 children treated with SABAs plus anticholinergics. This represents an overall number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) of 16 (95% CI 12 to 29).

Trends towards a greater effect with increased treatment intensity and with increased asthma severity were observed, but did not reach statistical significance. There was no effect modification due to concomitant use of oral corticosteroids and the effect of age could not be explored. However, exclusion of the one trial that included infants (< 18 months) and contributed data to the main outcome, did not affect the results. Statistically significant group differences favoring anticholinergic use were observed for lung function, clinical score at 120 minutes, oxygen saturation at 60 minutes, and the need for repeat use of bronchodilators prior to discharge from the emergency department. No significant group difference was seen in relapse rates.

Fewer children treated with anticholinergics plus SABA reported nausea and tremor compared with SABA alone; no significant group difference was observed for vomiting.

Authors' conclusions

Children with an asthma exacerbation experience a lower risk of admission to hospital if they are treated with the combination of inhaled SABAs plus anticholinergic versus SABA alone. They also experience a greater improvement in lung function and less risk of nausea and tremor. Within this group, the findings suggested, but did not prove, the possibility of an effect modification, where intensity of anticholinergic treatment and asthma severity, could be associated with greater benefit.

Further research is required to identify the characteristics of children that may benefit from anticholinergic use (e.g. age and asthma severity including mild exacerbation and impending respiratory failure) and the treatment modalities (dose, intensity, and duration) associated with most benefit from anticholinergic use better.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Combined inhaled anticholinergics and beta2-agonists for initial treatment of acute asthma in children

Background
In an asthma attack, the airways (small tubes in the lungs) narrow because of inflammation (swelling), muscle spasms and mucus secretions. Other symptoms include wheezing, coughing and chest tightness. This makes breathing difficult. Reliever inhalers typically contain short-acting beta2-agonists (SABAs) that relax the muscles in the airways, opening the airways so that breathing is easier. Anticholinergic drugs work by opening the airways and decreasing mucus secretions.

Review question
We looked at randomised controlled trials to find out whether giving inhaled anticholinergics plus SABAs (instead of SABAs on their own) in the emergency department provides benefits or harms in children having an asthma attack.

Key results
We found that children with a moderate or severe asthma attack who were given both drugs in the emergency department were less likely to be admitted to the hospital than those who only had SABAs. In the group receiving only SABAs, on average 23 out of 100 children with acute asthma were admitted to hospital compared with an average of 17 (95% CI 15 to 20) out of 100 children treated with SABAs plus anticholinergics. Taking both drugs was also better at improving lung function. Taking both drugs did not seem to reduce the possibility of another asthma attack. Fewer children treated with anticholinergics reported nausea and tremor, but no significant group difference was observed for vomiting.

Quality of the evidence and further research
Most of the studies were in preschool- and school-aged children; three studies also included a small proportion of infants under 18 months of age, although there was no evidence that inclusion of these infants with wheezy episodes affected the results. Nine trials (45%) were at a low risk of bias and we regarded the evidence for hospitalisation as high quality. Physicians can administer the dose of anticholinergic and SABA in several different ways; as a single dose, or as a certain number of doses or more flexibly. Most of the trials gave the children two or three doses and we think that more research is needed to improve characterization of children that benefit from, and the most effective number and frequency of doses of, anticholinergic treatment.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Anticholinergiques à inhaler et bêta2- agonistes à courte durée d'action combinés pour le traitement initial de l'asthme aigu chez l'enfant

Contexte

Il existe plusieurs options de traitement pour la prise en charge des exacerbations de l'asthme aiguës (aggravation durable des symptômes qui ne disparaît pas avec le traitement régulier et nécessite un changement de prise en charge). Les recommandations préconisent l'utilisation de bêta2-agonistes à courte durée d'action (BACA) chez l'enfant souffrant d'une exacerbation de l'asthme. Les agents anticholinergiques, tels que le bromure d'ipratropium et le sulfate d'atropine, ont une action plus lente et un plus faible effet bronchodilatateur, mais peuvent spécifiquement soulager le tonus bronchomoteur cholinergique et réduire l'Sdème et les sécrétions muqueuses. Par conséquent, l'association d'anticholinergiques à inhaler et de BACA peut donner une bronchodilatation accrue et prolongée.

Objectifs

Déterminer si l'addition d'anticholinergiques à inhaler aux BACA apporte une amélioration clinique et affecte l'incidence des effets indésirables chez les enfants souffrant d'exacerbations de l'asthme aiguës.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans MEDLINE (de 1966 à avril 2000), EMBASE (de 1980 à avril 2000), CINAHL (de 1982 à avril 2000) et dans les références bibliographiques d'études de versions antérieures de cette revue. Nous avons également contacté des fabricants de médicaments et des investigateurs. Pour la mise à jour de la revue de 2012, nous avons procédé à une recherche «toutes années» dans le registre du groupe Cochrane sur les voies respiratoires le 18 avril 2012.

Critères de sélection

Les essais en groupes parallèles randomisés comparant l'association d'anticholinergiques à inhaler et de BACA aux BACA seuls chez les enfants (âgés de 18 mois à 18 ans) souffrant d'une exacerbation de l'asthme aiguë.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont évalué la qualité méthodologique des essais et extrait des données de manière indépendante. Nous avons utilisé le système GRADE pour évaluer la qualité des preuves pour notre critère de jugement principal (l'hospitalisation).

Résultats Principaux

Vingt essais ont rempli les critères d'éligibilité de la revue, ils ont généré 24 comparaisons d'études et ont porté sur 2697 enfants randomisés, âgés de un à 18 ans, présentant principalement des exacerbations de l'asthme modérées ou graves. La plupart des études ont porté à la fois sur des enfants d'âge préscolaire et des enfants d'âge scolaire; trois études ont également inclus un petit nombre de nourrissons de moins de 18 mois. Neuf essais (45%) présentaient un faible risque de biais. La plupart des essais ont utilisé un protocole à dose fixe de trois doses de 250µg ou de deux doses de 500µg de bromure d'ipratropium en nébulisation en association avec un BACA pendant plus de 30 à 90 minutes, tandis que trois essais ont utilisé une dose unique et deux ont utilisé un protocole de dose flexible selon le besoin en BACA.

L'addition d'un anticholinergique à un BACA a sensiblement réduit le risque d'hospitalisation (risque relatif (RR) 0,73; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% 0,63 à 0,85; 15 études, 2497 enfants, preuves de grande qualité). Dans le groupe ne recevant que des BACA, 23 enfants sur 100 souffrant d'asthme aigu ont été hospitalisés comparé à 17 (IC à 95% 15 à 20) sur 100 enfants traités avec BACA plus anticholinergiques. Cela représente un nombre global de sujets à traiter (NST) pour obtenir un effet bénéfique supplémentaire de 16 (IC à 95% 12 à 29).

Des tendances à un plus grand effet avec une intensité de traitement accrue et avec une gravité de l'asthme accrue ont été observées, mais n'ont pas atteint une signification statistique. Il n'y a eu aucune modification de l'effet en raison de l'usage concomitant de corticoïdes oraux et l'effet de l'âge n'a pas pu être étudié. Cependant, l'exclusion de l'essai qui incluait des nourrissons (< 18 mois) et apportait des données sur le critère de jugement principal n'a pas affecté les résultats. Des différences statistiquement significatives entre les groupes en faveur de l'usage d'anticholinergiques ont été observées pour la fonction pulmonaire, le score clinique à 120 minutes, la saturation en oxygène à 60 minutes et la nécessité de l'usage répété de bronchodilatateurs avant la sortie du service des urgences. Aucune différence significative entre les groupes n'a été constatée concernant les taux de rechute.

Moins d'enfants traités aux anticholinergiques plus BACA ont rapporté des nausées et des tremblements comparé aux BACA seuls; aucune différence significative entre les groupes n'a été observée concernant les vomissements.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les enfants souffrant d'une exacerbation de l'asthme ont un moindre risque d'hospitalisation s'ils sont traités avec l'association de BACA à inhaler plus anticholinergiques versus BACA seuls. Ils ressentent également une plus grande amélioration de la fonction pulmonaire et un moindre risque de nausées et de tremblements. Au sein de ce groupe, les résultats ont suggéré, sans toutefois en apporter la preuve, la possibilité d'une modification de l'effet impliquant que l'intensité du traitement anticholinergique et la gravité de l'asthme pouvaient être associées à un plus grand bénéfice.

Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour mieux identifier les caractéristiques des enfants qui peuvent tirer un bénéfice de l'usage d'anticholinergiques (telles que lâge et la gravité de l'asthme, y compris les exacerbations bénignes et l'insuffisance respiratoire imminente) et les modalités du traitement (la dose, lintensité et la durée) associées au plus grand bénéfice de l'usage des anticholinergiques.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Anticholinergiques à inhaler et bêta2- agonistes à courte durée d'action combinés pour le traitement initial de l'asthme aigu chez l'enfant

Anticholinergiques à inhaler et bêta2- agonistes à courte durée d'action combinés pour le traitement initial de l'asthme aigu chez l'enfant

Contexte

Lors d'une crise d'asthme, les voies respiratoires (petits tubes dans les poumons) rétrécissent en raison d'une inflammation (gonflement) de spasmes musculaires et de sécrétions de mucus. Les autres symptômes comprennent une respiration sifflante, une toux et une oppression thoracique. Cela rend la respiration difficile. Les inhalateurs de soulagement contiennent habituellement des bêta2- agonistes à courte durée d'action (BACA) qui détendent les muscles des voies respiratoires, ce qui ouvre les voies respiratoires et facilite la respiration. Les médicaments anticholinergiques fonctionnent en ouvrant les voies respiratoires et en réduisant les sécrétions de mucus.

Question de la revue

Nous avons examiné les essais contrôlés randomisés pour déterminer si l'administration danticholinergiques à inhaler plus BACA (au lieu de BACA seuls) dans les services durgence était bénéfique ou préjudiciable aux enfants ayant une crise d'asthme.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons découvert que les enfants ayant une crise d'asthme modérée ou grave qui recevaient les deux médicaments dans le service des urgences avaient moins de risques d'être hospitalisés que ceux ne recevant que des BACA. Dans le groupe ne recevant que des BACA, en moyenne 23 enfants sur 100 souffrant d'asthme aigu ont été hospitalisés comparé à une moyenne de 17 (IC à 95% 15 à 20) sur 100 enfants traités avec BACA plus anticholinergiques. La prise des deux médicaments a également été plus efficace pour améliorer la fonction pulmonaire. La prise des deux médicaments n'a pas semblé réduire le risque d'une autre crise d'asthme. Moins d'enfants traités aux anticholinergiques ont rapporté des nausées et des tremblements, mais aucune différence significative entre les groupes n'a été observée concernant les vomissements.

Qualité des preuves et recherches supplémentaires

La plupart des études portaient sur des enfants d'âge préscolaire et scolaire; trois études comprenaient également un petit nombre de nourrissons de moins de 18 mois, bien qu'aucune preuve n'ait indiqué que l'inclusion de ces nourrissons présentant des épisodes de respiration sifflante ait affecté les résultats. Neuf essais (45%) avaient un faible risque de biais et nous avons considéré les preuves pour l'hospitalisation comme étant d'une grande qualité. Les médecins peuvent administrer la dose d'anticholinergiques et de BACA de plusieurs manières différentes; sous forme de dose unique ou d'un certain nombre de doses ou encore de manière plus flexible. Dans la plupart des essais, les enfants recevaient deux ou trois doses et nous pensons que des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour améliorer la caractérisation des enfants qui tirent un bénéfice du traitement anticholinergique, et du nombre et de la fréquence des doses le plus efficaces.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 12th November, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.