Intervention Review

Antibiotics for acute otitis media in children

  1. Roderick P Venekamp1,*,
  2. Sharon Sanders2,
  3. Paul P Glasziou3,
  4. Chris B Del Mar3,
  5. Maroeska M Rovers4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 8 NOV 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000219.pub3


How to Cite

Venekamp RP, Sanders S, Glasziou PP, Del Mar CB, Rovers MM. Antibiotics for acute otitis media in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD000219. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000219.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Otorhinolaryngology & Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht, Netherlands

  2. 2

    University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

  3. 3

    Bond University, Centre for Research in Evidence Based Practice, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia

  4. 4

    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Operating Rooms, Nijmegen, Netherlands

*Roderick P Venekamp, Department of Otorhinolaryngology & Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, Utrecht, 3508 GA, Netherlands. R.P.Venekamp@umcutrecht.nl.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions), comment added to review
  2. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common diseases in early infancy and childhood. Antibiotic use for AOM varies from 56% in the Netherlands to 95% in the USA, Canada and Australia.

Objectives

To assess the effects of antibiotics for children with AOM.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (2012, Issue 10), MEDLINE (1966 to October week 4, 2012), OLDMEDLINE (1958 to 1965), EMBASE (January 1990 to November 2012), Current Contents (1966 to November 2012), CINAHL (2008 to November 2012) and LILACS (2008 to November 2012).

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing 1) antimicrobial drugs with placebo and 2) immediate antibiotic treatment with expectant observation (including delayed antibiotic prescribing) in children with AOM.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data.

Main results

For the review of antibiotics against placebo, 12 RCTs (3317 children and 3854 AOM episodes) from high-income countries were eligible. However, one trial did not report patient-relevant outcomes, leaving 11 trials with generally low risk of bias. Pain was not reduced by antibiotics at 24 hours (risk ratio (RR) 0.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78 to 1.01) but almost a third fewer had residual pain at two to three days (RR 0.70; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.86; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 20) and fewer had pain at four to seven days (RR 0.79; 95% CI 0.66 to 0.95; NNTB 20). When compared with placebo, antibiotics did not alter the number of abnormal tympanometry findings at either four to six weeks (RR 0.92; 95% CI 0.83 to 1.01) or at three months (RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.76 to 1.24), or the number of AOM recurrences (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.78 to 1.10). However, antibiotic treatment did lead to a statistically significant reduction of tympanic membrane perforations (RR 0.37; 95% CI 0.18 to 0.76; NNTB 33) and halved contralateral AOM episodes (RR 0.49; 95% CI 0.25 to 0.95; NNTB 11) as compared with placebo. Severe complications were rare and did not differ between children treated with antibiotics and those treated with placebo. Adverse events (such as vomiting, diarrhoea or rash) occurred more often in children taking antibiotics (RR 1.34; 95% CI 1.16 to 1.55; number needed to treat for an additional harmful outcome (NNTH) 14). Funnel plots do not suggest publication bias. Individual patient data meta-analysis of a subset of included trials found antibiotics to be most beneficial in children aged less than two with bilateral AOM, or with both AOM and otorrhoea.

For the review of immediate antibiotics against expectant observation, five trials (1149 children) were eligible. Four trials (1007 children) reported outcome data that could be used for this review. From these trials, data from 959 children could be extracted for the meta-analysis on pain at days three to seven. No difference in pain was detectable at three to seven days (RR 0.75; 95% CI 0.50 to 1.12). No serious complications occurred in either the antibiotic group or the expectant observation group. Additionally, no difference in tympanic membrane perforations and AOM recurrence was observed. Immediate antibiotic prescribing was associated with a substantial increased risk of vomiting, diarrhoea or rash as compared with expectant observation (RR 1.71; 95% CI 1.24 to 2.36).

Authors' conclusions

Antibiotic treatment led to a statistically significant reduction of children with AOM experiencing pain at two to seven days compared with placebo but since most children (82%) settle spontaneously, about 20 children must be treated to prevent one suffering from ear pain at two to seven days. Additionally, antibiotic treatment led to a statistically significant reduction of tympanic membrane perforations (NNTB 33) and contralateral AOM episodes (NNTB 11). These benefits must be weighed against the possible harms: for every 14 children treated with antibiotics, one child experienced an adverse event (such as vomiting, diarrhoea or rash) that would not have occurred if antibiotics had been withheld. Antibiotics appear to be most useful in children under two years of age with bilateral AOM, or with both AOM and otorrhoea. For most other children with mild disease, an expectant observational approach seems justified. We have no trials in populations with higher risks of complications.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antibiotics for middle-ear infection (acute otitis media) in children

An acute middle-ear infection (acute otitis media (AOM)) is one of the most common childhood infections, causing pain and deafness. By three years of age, most children have had at least one AOM episode. Though AOM usually resolves without treatment, it is often treated with antibiotics. We assessed the effectiveness of antibiotics as compared to placebo in children with AOM. We included 12 trials with 3317 children and 3854 AOM episodes in this systematic review. Eleven trials reported patient-relevant outcome data. We found that antibiotics were not very useful for most children with AOM; antibiotics did not decrease the number of children with pain at 24 hours (when most children were better anyway), only slightly reduced the number of children with pain in the few days following and did not reduce the number of children with hearing loss (that can last several weeks). However, antibiotic treatment did reduce the number of tympanic membrane perforations and contralateral AOM episodes. Antibiotics seem to be most beneficial in children younger than two years of age with infection in both ears and in children with both AOM and discharge from the ear. There was not enough information to know if antibiotics reduced rare complications such as mastoiditis (infection of the bones around the ear).

Some guidelines have recommended a management approach in which certain children are observed and antibiotics taken only if symptoms remain or have worsened after a few days. We therefore also determined the effectiveness of immediate antibiotics as compared to expectant observation in children with AOM. We identified five eligible trials with 1149 children for this review. Four trials (including 1007 children) did report outcome data that could be used. We found no difference between immediate antibiotics and expectant observational approaches in the number of children with pain three to seven days after assessment.

All of the studies included in this review were from high-income countries. Data are lacking from populations in which the AOM incidence and risk of progression to mastoiditis is higher. Antibiotics caused unwanted effects such as diarrhoea, vomiting and rash and may also increase resistance to antibiotics in the community. It is difficult to balance the small benefits against the small harms of antibiotics in children with AOM. However, for most children with mild disease, an expectant observational approach seems justified.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antibiotiques pour l'otite moyenne aiguë chez l'enfant

Contexte

L'otite moyenne aiguë (OMA) est l'une des maladies les plus courantes de la petite enfance et de l'enfance. L'utilisation d'antibiotiques pour l'OMA varie de 56 % dans les Pays-Bas à 95 % aux États-Unis, au Canada et en Australie.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des antibiotiques pour les enfants souffrant d'une OMA.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL (2012, numéro 10), MEDLINE (de 1966 à la 4ème semaine d'octobre 2012), OLDMEDLINE (1958 à 1965), EMBASE (de janvier 1990 à novembre 2012), Current Contents (de 1966 à novembre 2012), CINAHL (de 2008 à novembre 2012) et LILACS (de 2008 à novembre 2012).

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant 1) des agents antimicrobiens à un placebo et 2) le traitement antibiotique immédiat avec l'observation non interventionniste (y compris la prescription d'antibiotiques différée) chez les enfants souffrant d'une OMA.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué la qualité des essais et extrait les données de manière indépendante.

Résultats Principaux

Pour la revue d'antibiotiques par rapport à un placebo, 12 ECR (3317 les enfants et 3854 épisodes d'OMA) dans des pays à revenus élevés, étaient éligibles. Cependant, un essai n'avait pas de critère de jugement relatif au devenir des patients, et il restait donc 11 essais présentant généralement un faible risque de biais. Les antibiotiques ne réduisaient pas la douleur au bout de 24 heures (risque relatif (RR) 0,89 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,78 à 1,01) mais près d'un tiers de moins présentait une douleur résiduelle après deux à trois jours (RR 0,70 ; IC à 95 % 0,57 à 0,86 ; nombre de sujets à traiter pour obtenir un résultat bénéfique supplémentaire (NSTb) 20) et moins présentaient des douleurs au bout de quatre à sept jours (RR 0,79 ; IC à 95 % 0,66 à 0,95 ; NST 20). Par rapport à un placebo, les antibiotiques n'ont pas modifié le nombre de résultats anormaux de la tympanométrie à quatre à six semaines (RR 0,92 ; IC à 95 % 0,83 à 1,01) ou au bout de trois mois (RR 0,97 ; IC à 95 % 0,76 à 1,24), ou le nombre de récidives d'OMA (RR 0,93 ; IC à 95 % 0,78 à 1,10). Cependant, un traitement antibiotique a conduit à une réduction statistiquement significative du nombre de perforations de la membrane tympanique (RR 0,37 ; IC à 95 % 0,18 à 0,76 ; NSTB 33) et réduit de moitié les épisodes dOMA controlatérale (RR de 0,49 ; IC à 95 % 0,25 à 0,95 ; NST 11) par rapport à un placebo. Les complications sévères étaient rares et ne différaient pas entre les enfants traités avec des antibiotiques et ceux traités avec un placebo. Les événements indésirables (tels que les vomissements, la diarrhée et les éruptions cutanées) étaient plus fréquents chez les enfants sous antibiotiques (RR 1,34 ; IC à 95 % 1,16 à 1,55 ; nombre nécessaire pour nuire (NNN) 14). Les graphiques type «funnel» ne suggèrent pas de biais de publication. Une méta-analyse des données individuelles des patients d'un sous-ensemble des essais inclus a trouvé les antibiotiques plus bénéfiques chez les enfants âgés de moins de deux ans souffrant d'une OMA bilatérale, ou à la fois avec une OMA et une otorrhée.

Pour la revue de la prescription immédiate d'antibiotiques par rapport à l'observation non interventionniste, cinq essais (1149 enfants) étaient éligibles. Quatre essais (1007 enfants) ont rapporté des données qui pouvaient être utilisées pour cette revue. À partir de ces essais, les données de 959 enfants ont pu être extraites pour la méta-analyse sur la douleur au bout de trois à sept jours. Aucune différence au niveau de la douleur était détectable après trois à sept jours (RR 0,75 ; IC à 95 % 0,50 à 1,12). Aucune complication grave nest survenue dans le groupe d'antibiotiques ou le groupe d'observation non interventionniste. De plus, aucune différence dans les perforations tympaniques et la récidive de l'OMA n'était observée. La prescription d'antibiotiques immédiate a été associée à un risque accru important de vomissements, de diarrhée et déruptions cutanées par rapport à l'observation non interventionniste (RR 1,01 ; IC à 95 % 1,24 à 2,36).

Conclusions des auteurs

Le traitement antibiotique a conduit à une réduction statistiquement significative des enfants souffrant de douleur en rapport avec une OMA à deux à sept jours, par rapport à un placebo, mais étant donné que la plupart des enfants (82 %) vont mieux spontanément, environ 20 enfants doivent être traités pour prévenir un souffrant de douleurs auriculaires à deux à sept jours. De plus, un traitement antibiotique a conduit à une réduction statistiquement significative du nombre de perforations de membrane tympanique (NSTb 33) et dépisodes d'OMA controlatérale (NSTb =11). Ces effets bénéfiques doivent être pondérés avec les possibles effets délétères : pour 14 enfants traités avec des antibiotiques, un enfant a subi un événement indésirable (tels que les vomissements, la diarrhée et les éruptions cutanées) qui ne se serait pas produit si les antibiotiques navaient pas été prescrits. Les antibiotiques semblent être le plus utile chez les enfants de moins de deux ans souffrant d'une OMA bilatérale, ou à la fois avec une OMA et une otorrhée. Pour la plupart des autres enfants atteints de maladie légère, une prise en charge non interventionniste et observationnelle semble justifiée. Nous navons aucun essai dans les populations présentant des risques plus élevés de complications.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antibiotiques pour l'otite moyenne aiguë chez l'enfant

Antibiotiques pour l'infection de loreille moyenne (otite moyenne aiguë) chez l'enfant

Une infection aiguë de loreille moyenne (otite moyenne aiguë (OMA)) est l'une des infections infantiles les plus fréquentes, provoquant des douleurs et de la surdité. A l'âge de trois ans, la plupart des enfants ont eu au moins un épisode d'OMA. Alors que lOMA se guérit généralement sans traitement, elle est souvent traitée par antibiotiques. Nous avons évalué l'efficacité des antibiotiques par rapport à un placebo chez les enfants souffrant d'une OMA. Nous avons inclus 12 essais totalisant 3317 enfants et 3854 épisodes d'OMA dans cette revue systématique. Onze essais ont rapporté des données de résultats pertinentes pour le patient. Nous avons trouvé que les antibiotiques nétaient pas très utile pour la plupart des enfants souffrant d'une OMA ; les antibiotiques ne réduisaient pas le nombre d'enfants souffrant de douleur au bout de 24 heures (lorsque la plupart des enfants se sentaient mieux de toute façon), le nombre d'enfants souffrant de douleur dans les quelques jours après et n'a pas réduit le nombre d'enfants souffrant d'une perte daudition (qui peut durer plusieurs semaines). Cependant, un traitement antibiotique réduisait le nombre de perforations tympaniques et dépisodes controlatéraux d'OMA. Les antibiotiques semblent être plus salutaires chez les enfants de moins de deux ans souffrant d'infection dans les deux oreilles et chez les enfants atteints à la fois d'OMA et découlement de l'oreille. Il n'y a pas suffisamment d'informations pour savoir si les antibiotiques réduisaient le risque de complications rares telles que mastoïdite (infection de los autour de l'oreille).

Certaines recommandations préconisent une approche de prise en charge dans lesquels les enfants sont observés et les antibiotiques administrés uniquement si les symptômes persistent ou empirent après quelques jours. Nous avons également déterminé l'efficacité des antibiotiques débutés immédiatement par rapport à l'observation non interventionniste chez les enfants souffrant d'une OMA. Nous avons identifié cinq essais éligibles portant sur 1149 enfants pour cette revue. Quatre essais (incluant 1007 enfants) ont fourni des données pouvant être utilisées. Nous navons trouvé aucune différence entre les antibiotiques débutés immédiatement et lapproche dobservation non interventionniste dans le nombre d'enfants souffrant de douleur trois à sept jours après l'évaluation.

Toutes les études incluses dans cette revue provenaient de pays à revenu élevé. Les données sont insuffisantes en ce qui concerne les populations dans lesquelles lincidence et le risque de progression vers mastoïdite sont plus élevés. Les antibiotiques provoquaient des effets indésirables tels que des diarrhées, des vomissements et des éruptions cutanées et peuvent également augmenter la résistance aux antibiotiques dans la communauté. Il est difficile d'équilibre les faibles bénéfices avec les légers effets délétères des antibiotiques chez les enfants souffrant d'une OMA. Cependant, pour la plupart des enfants atteints de maladie légère, une prise en charge non interventionniste et observationnelle semble justifiée.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 5th November, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux