Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Deworming drugs for soil-transmitted intestinal worms in children: effects on nutritional indicators, haemoglobin and school performance

  1. David C Taylor-Robinson1,*,
  2. Nicola Maayan2,
  3. Karla Soares-Weiser2,
  4. Sarah Donegan1,
  5. Paul Garner1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group

Published Online: 14 NOV 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 31 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000371.pub5


How to Cite

Taylor-Robinson DC, Maayan N, Soares-Weiser K, Donegan S, Garner P. Deworming drugs for soil-transmitted intestinal worms in children: effects on nutritional indicators, haemoglobin and school performance. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD000371. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000371.pub5.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, International Health Group, Liverpool, Merseyside, UK

  2. 2

    Enhance Reviews Ltd, Wantage, UK

*David C Taylor-Robinson, International Health Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, Merseyside, L3 5QA, UK. David.Taylor-Robinson@liverpool.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 14 NOV 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends treating all school children at regular intervals with deworming drugs in areas where helminth infection is common. The WHO state this will improve nutritional status, haemoglobin, and cognition and thus will improve health, intellect, and school attendance. Consequently, it is claimed that school performance will improve, child mortality will decline, and economic productivity will increase. Given the important health and societal benefits attributed to this intervention, we sought to determine whether they are based on reliable evidence.

Objectives

To summarize the effects of giving deworming drugs to children to treat soil-transmitted intestinal worms (nematode geohelminths) on weight, haemoglobin, and cognition; and the evidence of impact on physical well being, school attendance, school performance, and mortality.

Search methods

In February 2012, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, mRCT, and reference lists, and registers of ongoing and completed trials.

Selection criteria

We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs comparing deworming drugs for geohelminth worms with placebo or no treatment in children aged 16 years or less, reporting on weight, haemoglobin, and formal test of intellectual development. In cluster-RCTs treating communities or schools, we also sought data on school attendance, school performance, and mortality. We included trials that included health education with deworming.

Data collection and analysis

At least two authors independently assessed the trials, evaluated risk of bias, and extracted data. Continuous data were analysed using the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where data were missing, we contacted trial authors. We used GRADE to assess evidence quality, and this is reflected in the wording we used: high quality ("deworming improves...."); moderate quality ("deworming probably improves..."); low quality ("deworming may improve...."); and very low quality ("we don't know if deworming improves....").

Main results

We identified 42 trials, including eight cluster trials, that met the inclusion criteria. Excluding one trial where data are awaited, the 41 trials include 65,168 participants.

Screening then treating

For children known to be infected with worms (by screening), a single dose of deworming drugs may increase weight (0.58 kg, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.76, three trials, 139 participants; low quality evidence) and may increase haemoglobin (0.37 g/dL, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.64, two trials, 108 participants; low quality evidence), but we do not know if there is an effect on cognitive functioning (two trials, very low quality evidence).

Single dose deworming for all children

In trials treating all children, a single dose of deworming drugs gave mixed effects on weight, with no effects evident in seven trials, but large effects in two (nine trials, 3058 participants, very low quality evidence). The two trials with a positive effect were from the same very high prevalence setting and may not be easily generalised elsewhere. Single dose deworming probably made little or no effect on haemoglobin (mean difference (MD) 0.06 g/dL, 95% CI -0.06 to 0.17, three trials, 1005 participants; moderate evidence), and may have little or no effect on cognition (two trials, low quality evidence).

Mulitple dose deworming for all children

Over the first year of follow up, multiple doses of deworming drugs given to all children may have little or no effect on weight (MD 0.06 kg, 95% CI -0.17 to 0.30; seven trials, 2460 participants; low quality evidence); haemoglobin, (mean 0.01 g/dL lower; 95% CI 0.14 lower to 0.13 higher; four trials, 807 participants; low quality evidence); cognition (three trials, 30,571 participants, low quality evidence); or school attendance (4% higher attendance; 95% CI -6 to 14; two trials, 30,243 participants; low quality evidence);

For time periods beyond a year, there were five trials with weight measures. One cluster-RCT of 3712 children in a low prevalence area showed a large effect (average gain of 0.98 kg), whilst the other four trials did not show an effect, including a cluster-RCT of 27,995 children in a moderate prevalence area (five trials, 37,306 participants; low quality evidence). For height, we are uncertain whether there is an effect of deworming (-0.26 cm; 95% CI -0.84 to 0.31, three trials, 6652 participants; very low quality evidence). Deworming may have little or no effect on haemoglobin (0.00 g/dL, 95%CI -0.08 to 0.08, two trials, 1365 participants, low quality evidence); cognition (two trials, 3720 participants; moderate quality evidence). For school attendance, we are uncertain if there is an effect (mean attendance 5% higher, 95% CI -0.5 to 10.5, approximately 20,000 participants, very low quality evidence).

Stratified analysis to seek subgroup effects into low, medium and high helminth endemicity areas did not demonstrate any pattern of effect. In a sensitivity analysis that only included trials with adequate allocation concealment, we detected no significant effects for any primary outcomes.

One million children were randomized in a deworming trial from India with mortality as the primary outcome. This was completed in 2005 but the authors have not published the results.

Authors' conclusions

Screening children for intestinal helminths and then treating infected children appears promising, but the evidence base is small. Routine deworming drugs given to school children has been more extensively investigated, and has not shown benefit on weight in most studies, except for substantial weight changes in three trials conducted 15 years ago or more. Two of these trials were carried out in the same high prevalence setting. For haemoglobin and cognition, community deworming seems to have little or no effect, and the evidence in relation to school attendance, and school performance is generally poor, with no obvious or consistent effect. Our interpretation of this data is that it is probably misleading to justify contemporary deworming programmes based on evidence of consistent benefit on nutrition, haemoglobin, school attendance or school performance as there is simply insufficient reliable information to know whether this is so.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Deworming drugs for treating soil-transmitted intestinal worms in children: effects on nutrition and school performance

The main soil-transmitted worms are roundworms, hookworms, and whipworms. Infections are common in tropical and subtropical areas, particularly in children from low-income areas where there is inadequate sanitation, overcrowding, low levels of education, and lack of access to health care. These infections sometimes cause malnutrition, poor growth, and anaemia in children, and some experts believe they cause poor performance at school. While improved sanitation and hygiene are likely to be helpful, drugs can also be used. In one approach, individuals found to be infected on screening are treated. Evidence from these trials suggests this probably improves weight and may improve haemoglobin values, but the evidence base is small. In another approach, currently recommended by the WHO, and much more extensively investigated, all school children are treated. In trials that follow up children after a single dose of deworming, and after multiple doses with follow up for over a year, we do not know if these programmes have an effect on weight, height, school attendance, or school performance; they may have little or no effect on haemoglobin or cognition.

One trial of a million children examined death and was completed in 2005 but the authors have not yet published the results.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Médicaments vermifuges utilisés pour les vers intestinaux transmis par le sol chez les enfants : Effets sur les indicateurs nutritionnels, l'hémoglobine et les performances scolaires

Contexte

L'Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) recommande de traiter tous les enfants scolarisés à intervalles réguliers avec des médicaments vermifuges dans les régions où l'helminthiase est fréquente. L'OMS déclare que cela améliorera le statut nutritionnel, l'hémoglobine et la fonction cognitive et de fait améliorera la santé, l'intellect et l'assiduité scolaire. En conséquence, il est allégué que les performances scolaires s'amélioreront, la mortalité infantile reculera et la productivité économique augmentera. Au vu des importants bénéfices sanitaires et sociétaux attribués à cette intervention, nous avons cherché à déterminer s'ils étaient basés sur des données fiables.

Objectifs

Résumer les effets des médicaments vermifuges donnés aux enfants pour traiter les vers intestinaux transmis par le sol (géo-helminthes nématodes) sur le poids, l'hémoglobine et la fonction cognitive ; et les données relatives à l'impact sur le bien-être physique, l'assiduité à l'école, les performances scolaires et la mortalité.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

En février 2012, nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les maladies infectieuses, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, m ECR, et les références bibliographiques, ainsi que les registres des essais en cours et terminés.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons sélectionné des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et des essais contrôlés quasi-randomisés comparant les médicaments vermifuges utilisés pour les géo-helminthes et un placebo ou l'absence de traitement chez les enfants âgés de 16 ans maximum, indiquant le poids, l'hémoglobine, et un test formel sur le développement intellectuel. Dans les ECR en cluster traitant les communautés ou les écoles, nous avons également recherché les données sur l'assiduité à l'école, les performances scolaires et la mortalité. Nous avons inclus les essais qui prenaient en compte un enseignement sur les questions de santé avec le déparasitage.

Recueil et analyse des données

Au moins deux auteurs ont indépendamment évalué les essais et les risques de biais et extrait des données. Pour analyser les données continues, nous avons calculé la différence moyenne (DM) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95%. Lorsque les données étaient manquantes, nous avons contacté les auteurs des essais. Nous avons utilisé le système GRADE pour évaluer la qualité des données et cela se reflétait comme suit dans la formulation que nous avons utilisée: qualité élevée («le déparasitage améliore...»); qualité modérée («le déparasitage améliore probablement...»); qualité faible («le déparasitage est susceptible d'améliorer...»); et qualité très faible («nous ne savons pas si le déparasitage améliore...»).

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié 42essais, comprenant huit essais en cluster, qui répondaient aux critères d'inclusion. A l'exception d'un essai dont les données sont attendues, les 41essais totalisaient 65168participants.

Dépister puis traiter

Pour les enfants détectés pour être infectées de vers (par le dépistage), une dose unique de médicament vermifuge pourrait augmenter le poids (0,58 kg, IC à 95 % 0,40 à 0,76, trois essais, 139 participants ; données de faible qualité) et pourrait augmenter l'hémoglobine (0,37 g/dl, IC à 95 % entre 0,1 et 0,64, deux essais, 108 participants ; données de faible qualité), mais nous ne savons pas s'il existe un effet sur la fonction cognitive (deux essais, données de très faible qualité).

Le traitement vermifuge en dose unique pour tous les enfants

Dans les essais qui ont traité tous les enfants, une dose unique de médicament vermifuge apportait des effets mixtes sur le poids, avec aucun effet évident dans sept essais, mais des effets importants dans deux essais (neuf essais, 3 058 participants, données de très faible qualité). Les deux essais avec un effet positif étaient des milieux similaires à très haute prévalence et peuvent ne pas être facilement généralisables ailleurs. Une dose unique de médicament vermifuge apporte probablement que peu ou pas d'effet sur l'hémoglobine (différence moyenne (DM) à 95 % de 0,06 g/dl, IC à 95 % -0,06 à 0,17, trois essais, 1005 participants ; données de qualité modérée) et peut avoir que peu ou pas d'effet sur la fonction cognitive (deux essais, données de faible qualité).

Le traitement vermifuge en doses multiples pour tous les enfants

Pendant la première année de suivi, des doses multiples de médicaments vermifuges administrés à tous les enfants pourraient avoir que peu ou pas d'effet sur le poids (DM 0,06 kg, IC à 95 % -0,17 à 0,30 ; sept essais, 2460 participants ; données de faible qualité) ; l'hémoglobine (moyenne 0,01 g/dl inférieur ; IC à 95 % 0,14 inférieur à 0,13 supérieur ; quatre essais, 807 participants ; données de faible qualité) ; la fonction cognitive (trois essais, 30,571 participants, données de faible qualité) ; ou l'assiduité à l'école (assiduité supérieure de 4 % ; IC à 95% entre -6 à 14 ; deux essais, 30,243 participants ; données de faible qualité) ;

Pour les périodes au-delà d'une année, il y avait cinq essais avec les mesures du poids. Un ECR en groupes de 3 712 enfants dans une région à faible prévalence a montré un effet important (gain moyen de 0,98 kg), alors que les quatre autres essais n'ont montré aucun effet, y compris un ECR en groupes de 27 995 enfants dans une région à prévalence modérée (cinq essais, 37,306 participants ; données de faible qualité). Pour la taille, nous ne savons pas s'il existe un effet lié au médicament vermifuge (-0,26 cm ; IC à 95 % -0,84 à 0,31, trois essais, 6652 participants ; données de qualité très médiocre). Le traitement vermifuge pourrait n'avoir que peu ou pas d'effet sur l'hémoglobine (0,00 g/dl, IC à 95 % -0,08 à 0,08, deux essais, 1 365 participants, données de faible qualité) ; la fonction cognitive (deux essais, 3720 participants ; données de qualité modérée). Pour l'assiduité à l'école, nous ne savons pas s'il y a un effet (moyenne de 5 % de fréquentation plus élevée, IC à 95 % -0,5 à 10,5, environ 20 000 participants, données de très faible qualité).

L'analyse stratifiée pour rechercher les effets de sous-groupes dans les régions à faible, moyenne et forte endémicité de l'helminthe n'a pas démontré de profil d'effet. L'analyse stratifiée pour rechercher les effets de sous-groupes dans les régions à faible, moyenne et forte endémicité de l'helminthe n'a pas démontré de profil d'effet. Nous n'avons détecté aucun effet significatif pour les résultats primaires dans une analyse de sensibilité incluant seulement les essais avec une assignation secrète appropriée.

Un million d'enfants ont été randomisés dans un essai sur le déparasitage en Inde avec la mortalité comme résultat principal. Il s'est terminé en 2005 mais les auteurs n'ont pas publié les résultats

Conclusions des auteurs

Le dépistage des enfants pour les helminthes intestinaux et ensuite le traitement des enfants infectés semblent prometteurs, mais la base de données est restreinte. Les médicaments vermifuges habituels donnés aux enfants scolarisés ont été étudiés de manière plus approfondie, et n'ont montré aucun bénéfice sur le poids dans la plupart des études, à l'exception des changements pondéraux substantiels dans trois essais réalisés il y a 15ans et plus. Deux de ces essais ont été réalisés dans la même configuration de prévalence élevée. Pour l'hémoglobine et la fonction cognitive, la vermifugation communautaire semble avoir un léger effet ou aucun, et les données en lien avec l'assiduité à l'école et les performances scolaires sont généralement pauvres, avec aucun effet évident ou cohérent. Notre interprétation de ces données est qu'elles peuvent s'avérer trompeuses pour justifier les programmes contemporains de déparasitage basés sur les données factuelles d'un bénéfice cohérent sur la nutrition, l'hémoglobine, l'assiduité à l'école ou les performances scolaires étant donné qu'il n'existe tout simplement pas assez d'informations fiables permettant de savoir si cela est effectivement le cas.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Médicaments vermifuges utilisés pour les vers intestinaux transmis par le sol chez les enfants : Effets sur les indicateurs nutritionnels, l'hémoglobine et les performances scolaires

Médicaments vermifuges utilisés pour traiter les vers intestinaux transmis par le sol chez les enfants : Effets sur la nutrition et les performances scolaires

Les principaux vers transmis par le sol sont l'ascaris, l'ankylostome et le trichocéphale. Les infections sont courantes dans les régions tropicales ou subtropicales, en particulier chez les enfants vivant dans les régions à faible revenus où les conditions sanitaires sont mauvaises, la surpopulation est présente, les niveaux d'éducation sont faibles et le manque d'accès aux soins médicaux se fait sentir. Ces infections entraînent parfois une malnutrition, une mauvaise croissance et une anémie chez les enfants ; certains experts pensent aussi qu'elles sont la cause des mauvaises performances scolaires. Tandis que de meilleures conditions sanitaires et hygiéniques peuvent se révéler utiles, les médicaments peuvent également être utilisés. Selon une approche, les individus diagnostiqués comme infectés pendant le dépistage sont traités. Les données provenant de ces essais suggèrent que cela améliore vraisemblablement le poids et peut améliorer les valeurs d'hémoglobine, mais la base de données factuelle est mince. Selon une autre approche, actuellement recommandée par l'OMS, et étudiée de manière beaucoup plus détaillée, tous les enfants scolarisés sont traités. Dans les essais qui suivent les enfants après une dose unique de vermifuge et après plusieurs doses avec un suivi sur plus d'une année, nous ne savons pas si ces programmes ont un effet sur le poids, la taille, l'assiduité à l'école ou les performances scolaires ; il se peut quils aient peu ou pas d'effet sur l'hémoglobine ou la fonction cognitive.

Un essai totalisant un million d'enfants a examiné les décès, il s'est terminé en 2005 mais les auteurs n'ont pas encore publié les résultats.

Notes de traduction

Pas applicable.

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 12th November, 2013
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français