Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Drugs for treating Schistosoma mansoni infection

  1. Anthony Danso-Appiah1,*,
  2. Piero L Olliaro2,
  3. Sarah Donegan1,
  4. David Sinclair1,
  5. Jürg Utzinger3,4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group

Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 16 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000528.pub2

How to Cite

Danso-Appiah A, Olliaro PL, Donegan S, Sinclair D, Utzinger J. Drugs for treating Schistosoma mansoni infection. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD000528. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD000528.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, International Health Group, Liverpool, UK

  2. 2

    World Health Organization, UNICEF/UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), Geneva, Switzerland

  3. 3

    Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Basel, Switzerland

  4. 4

    University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland

*Anthony Danso-Appiah, International Health Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, L3 5QA, UK. tdappiah@yahoo.co.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic infection common in the tropics and sub-tropics. Chronic and advanced disease includes abdominal pain, diarrhoea, blood in the stool, liver cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and premature death.

Objectives

To evaluate the effects of antischistosomal drugs, used alone or in combination, for treating S. mansoni infection.

Search methods

We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS from inception to October 2012, with no language restrictions. We also searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012) and mRCT. The reference lists of articles were reviewed and experts were contacted for unpublished studies.

Selection criteria

Randomized controlled trials of antischistosomal drugs, used alone or in combination, versus placebo, different antischistosomal drugs, or different doses of the same antischistosomal drug for treating S. mansoni infection.

Data collection and analysis

One author extracted data and assessed eligibility and risk of bias in the included studies, which were independently checked by a second author. We combined dichotomous outcomes using risk ratio (RR) and continuous data weighted mean difference (WMD); we presented both with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach.

Main results

Fifty-two trials enrolling 10,269 participants were included. The evidence was of moderate or low quality due to the trial methods and small numbers of included participants.

Praziquantel

Compared to placebo, praziquantel 40 mg/kg probably reduces parasitological treatment failure at one month post-treatment (RR 3.13, 95% CI 1.03 to 9.53, two trials, 414 participants, moderate quality evidence). Compared to this standard dose, lower doses may be inferior (30 mg/kg: RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.01, three trials, 521 participants, low quality evidence; 20 mg/kg: RR 2.23, 95% CI 1.64 to 3.02, two trials, 341 participants, low quality evidence); and higher doses, up to 60 mg/kg, do not appear to show any advantage (four trials, 783 participants, moderate quality evidence).

The absolute parasitological cure rate at one month with praziquantel 40 mg/kg varied substantially across studies, ranging from 52% in Senegal in 1993 to 92% in Brazil in 2006/2007.

Oxamniquine

Compared to placebo, oxamniquine 40 mg/kg probably reduces parasitological treatment failure at three months (RR 8.74, 95% CI 3.74 to 20.43, two trials, 82 participants, moderate quality evidence). Lower doses than 40 mg/kg may be inferior at one month (30 mg/kg: RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.75, four trials, 268 participants, low quality evidence; 20 mg/kg: RR 3.78, 95% CI 2.05 to 6.99, two trials, 190 participants, low quality evidence), and higher doses, such as 60 mg/kg, do not show a consistent benefit (four trials, 317 participants, low quality evidence).

These trials are now over 20 years old and only limited information was provided on the study designs and methods.

Praziquantel versus oxamniquine

Only one small study directly compared praziquantel 40 mg/kg with oxamniquine 40 mg/kg and we are uncertain which treatment is more effective in reducing parasitological failure (one trial, 33 participants, very low quality evidence). A further 10 trials compared oxamniquine at 20, 30 and 60 mg/kg with praziquantel 40 mg/kg and did not show any marked differences in failure rate or percent egg reduction.

Combination treatments

We are uncertain whether combining praziquantel with artesunate reduces failures compared to praziquantel alone at one month (one trial, 75 participants, very low quality evidence).

Two trials also compared combinations of praziquantel and oxamniquine in different doses, but did not find statistically significant differences in failure (two trials, 87 participants).

Other outcomes and analyses

In trials reporting clinical improvement evaluating lower doses (20 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg) against the standard 40 mg/kg for both praziquantel or oxamniquine, no dose effect was demonstrable in resolving abdominal pain, diarrhoea, blood in stool, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly (follow up at one, three, six, 12, and 24 months; three trials, 655 participants).

Adverse events were not well-reported but were mostly described as minor and transient.

In an additional analysis of treatment failure in the treatment arm of individual studies stratified by age, failure rates with 40 mg/kg of both praziquantel and oxamniquine were higher in children.

Authors' conclusions

Praziquantel 40 mg/kg as the standard treatment for S. mansoni infection is consistent with the evidence. Oxamniquine, a largely discarded alternative, also appears effective.

Further research will help find the optimal dosing regimen of both these drugs in children.

Combination therapy, ideally with drugs with unrelated mechanisms of action and targeting the different developmental stages of the schistosomes in the human host should be pursued as an area for future research.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Drugs for treating Schistosoma mansoni infection

Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic worm common in Africa, the Middle East and parts of South America. The worm larvae live in ponds and lakes contaminated by faeces, and can penetrate a persons’ skin when they swim or bathe. Inside the host, the larvae grow into adult worms; these produce eggs, which are excreted in the faeces. Eggs rather than worms cause disease. Long-term infection can cause bloody diarrhoea, abdominal pains, and enlargement of the liver and spleen.

In this review, researchers in the Cochrane Collaboration evaluated drug treatments for people infected with Schistosoma mansoni. After searching for all relevant studies, they found 52 trials, including 10,269 people, conducted in Africa, Brazil and the Middle East. Most trials report on whether or not the treatment stops eggs excretion; three reported the persons recovery from symptoms.

The results show that a single dose of praziquantel (40 mg/kg), as recommended by the World Health Organization, is an effective treatment for Schistosoma mansoni infection. Lower doses may be less effective, and higher doses probably have no additional benefit.

Oxamniquine (40 mg/kg), though now rarely used, is also effective. Again, lower doses may be less effective and no advantage has been demonstrated with higher doses.

Only one study directly compared praziquantel 40 mg/kg with oxamniquine 40 mg/kg, and based on this limited evidence, we are uncertain which intervention is more effective. Adverse events were not well reported for either drug, but were mostly described as minor and transient.

In children aged less than 5 years, there is limited evidence that these doses may be less effective, and further research will help optimise the dose for this age-group.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Médicaments pour traiter l'infection à Schistosoma mansoni

Contexte

Schistosoma mansoni est une infection parasitaire commune dans les régions tropicales et subtropicales. La maladie chronique à un stade avancé se caractérise par des douleurs abdominales, des diarrhées, la présence de sang dans les selles, une cirrhose du foie, une hypertension portale et un décès prématuré.

Objectifs

Evaluer les effets des médicaments antibilharziens, utilisés seuls ou en association, pour traiter l'infection à S. mansoni .

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans MEDLINE, EMBASE et LILACS de leur origine jusqu'à octobre 2012, sans aucune restriction de langue. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les maladies infectieuses, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012) et mREC. Les bibliographies des articles ont été examinées et des experts ont été contactés afin d'obtenir des études non publiées.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés portant sur des médicaments antibilharziens, utilisés seuls ou en association, versus placebo, différents médicaments antibilharziens ou différentes doses du même médicament antibilharzien pour traiter l'infection à S. mansoni.

Recueil et analyse des données

Un auteur a extrait des données et évalué l'éligibilité et le risque de biais des études incluses, ce qui a fait l'objet d'une vérification indépendante par un second auteur. Nous avons combiné les résultats dichotomiques au moyen du risque relatif (RR) et les données continues sous la forme d'une différence moyenne pondérée (DMP) ; nous avons présenté ces deux résultats avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 %. Nous avons évalué la qualité des preuves en utilisant l'approche GRADE.

Résultats Principaux

Cinquante-deux essais totalisant 10 269 participants ont été inclus. Les preuves étaient de qualité modérée ou médiocre en raison des méthodes utilisées dans les essais et du faible nombre de participants inclus.

Praziquantel

Comparé à un placebo, le praziquantel à 40 mg/kg réduit probablement l'échec du traitement antiparasitaire à un mois après le traitement (RR 3,13, IC à 95 % 1,03 à 9,53, deux essais, 414 participants, preuves de qualité modérée). Comparé à cette dose standard, des doses plus faibles pourraient être moins efficaces (30 mg/kg : RR 1,52, IC à 95 % 1,15 à 2,01, trois essais, 521 participants, preuves de qualité médiocre ; 20 mg/kg : RR 2,23, IC à 95 % 1,64 à 3,02, deux essais, 341 participants, preuves de qualité médiocre) ; et des doses plus élevées, jusqu'à 60 mg/kg, ne semblent pas présenter d'avantage (quatre essais, 783 participants, preuves de qualité modérée).

Le taux de guérison parasitologique absolu à un mois avec le praziquantel à 40 mg/kg variait sensiblement entre les études, de 52 % au Sénégal en 1993 à 92 % au Brésil en 2006/2007.

Oxamniquine

Comparé à un placebo, l'oxamniquine à 40 mg/kg réduit probablement l'échec du traitement antiparasitaire à trois mois (RR 8,74, IC à 95 % 3,74 à 20,43, deux essais, 82 participants, preuves de qualité modérée). Des doses inférieures à 40 mg/kg pourraient être moins efficaces à un mois (30 mg/kg : RR 1,78, IC à 95 % 1,15 à 2,75, quatre essais, 268 participants, preuves de qualité médiocre ; 20 mg/kg : RR 3,78, IC à 95 % 2,05 à 6,99, deux essais, 190 participants, preuves de qualité médiocre), et des doses plus élevées, telles que 60 mg/kg, ne montrent pas un bénéfice constant (quatre essais, 317 participants, preuves de qualité médiocre).

Ces essais ont aujourd'hui plus de 20 ans et ne fournissaient que des informations limitées concernant les plans d'étude et les méthodes.

Praziquantel versus oxamniquine

Une seule étude, de petite taille, a comparé directement le praziquantel à 40 mg/kg à l'oxamniquine à 40 mg/kg et nous n'avons aucune certitude quant au traitement le plus efficace pour réduire l'échec du traitement antiparasitaire (un essai, 33 participants, preuves de très médiocre qualité). 10 essais supplémentaires ont comparé l'oxamniquine à 20, 30 et 60 mg/kg au praziquantel à 40 mg/kg et n'ont montré aucune différence significative en termes de taux d'échec ou de pourcentage de réduction du nombre d'œufs.

Traitements combinés

Nous ignorons si l'association du praziquantel à l'artésunate réduit les échecs comparé au praziquantel seul à un mois (un essai, 75 participants, preuves de très médiocre qualité).

Deux essais ont également comparé des associations de praziquantel et d'oxamniquine dans différentes doses, mais n'ont pas découvert de différences statistiquement significatives en termes d'échec (deux essais, 87 participants).

Autres résultats et analyses

Dans les essais rapportant une amélioration clinique évaluant des doses plus faibles (20 mg/kg et 30 mg/kg) par rapport à la dose standard de 40 mg/kg pour le praziquantel et l'oxamniquine, aucun effet de dose n'a pu être démontré concernant la disparition des douleurs abdominales, des diarrhées, du sang dans les selles, de l'hépatomégalie et de la splénomégalie (suivi à un, trois, six, 12 et 24 mois ; trois essais, 655 participants).

Les événements indésirables n'ont pas été bien rapportés, mais ont été essentiellement décrits comme mineurs et transitoires.

Dans une analyse supplémentaire de l'échec du traitement dans le bras de traitement d'études particulières stratifiées par âge, les taux d'échec avec 40 mg/kg de praziquantel et d'oxamniquine ont été supérieurs chez les enfants.

Conclusions des auteurs

Le praziquantel à 40 mg/kg comme traitement standard de l'infection à S. mansoni est cohérent avec les preuves. L'oxamniquine, une alternative globalement abandonnée, semble également efficace.

Des recherches supplémentaires permettront de trouver la posologie optimale pour ces deux médicaments chez l'enfant.

La thérapie combinée, idéalement avec des médicaments ayant des mécanismes d'action sans lien entre eux et ciblant les différents stades de développement des schistosomes chez l'hôte humain, doit être considérée comme un domaine d'intérêt pour les recherches futures.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Médicaments pour traiter l'infection à Schistosoma mansoni

Médicaments pour traiter l'infection à Schistosoma mansoni

Schistosoma mansoni est un vers parasite commun en Afrique, au Moyen-Orient et dans certaines régions d'Amérique du Sud. Les larves du vers vivent dans des étangs et des lacs contaminés par des fèces et peuvent pénétrer dans la peau d'une personne lorsqu'elle nage ou se baigne. A l'intérieur de l'hôte, les larves se transforment en vers adultes ; ceux-ci produisent des œufs qui sont excrétés dans les selles. Ce sont les œufs et non les vers qui provoquent la maladie. L'infection à long terme peut provoquer des diarrhées sanglantes, des douleurs abdominales et une hypertrophie du foie et de la rate.

Dans cette revue, les chercheurs de la Cochrane Collaboration ont évalué des traitements médicamenteux pour les personnes infectées par Schistosoma mansoni. Après avoir recherché toutes les études pertinentes, ils ont trouvé 52 essais, portant sur 10 269 personnes et réalisés en Afrique, au Brésil et au Moyen-Orient. La plupart des essais indiquent si le traitement stoppe l'excrétion d'œufs ; trois ont notifié la guérison des symptômes chez les individus.

Les résultats montrent qu'une dose unique de praziquantel (40 mg/kg), selon les recommandations de l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé, est un traitement efficace contre l'infection à Schistosoma mansoni. Des doses plus faibles pourraient être moins efficaces et des doses plus fortes n'ont probablement aucun effet bénéfique supplémentaire.

L'oxamniquine (40 mg/kg), bien qu'elle soit désormais rarement utilisée, est également efficace. De même, des doses plus faibles pourraient être moins efficaces et aucun avantage n'a été démontré avec des doses plus importantes.

Une seule étude a comparé directement le praziquantel à 40 mg/kg à l'oxamniquine à 40 mg/kg et ces preuves limitées ne nous permettent pas de déterminer avec certitude quelle intervention est plus efficace. Les événements indésirables n'ont été bien rapportés pour aucun des deux médicaments, mais ont été essentiellement décrits comme mineurs et transitoires.

Chez les enfants de moins de 5 ans, des preuves limitées indiquent que ces doses pourraient être moins efficaces et des recherches supplémentaires permettront d'optimiser la dose pour ce groupe d'âge.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Ministère de la Santé. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada, ministère de la Santé du Québec, Fonds de recherche de Québec-Santé et Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux.